Celebrating Infant Mental Health Awareness Week

This summer, we are revisiting some of our previous publications as they relate to various national celebrations. 

This week is Infant Mental Health Awareness Week, so we are re-sharing “Breastfeeding is…” a 2014 piece. Based on an interview with Barb O’Connor, this piece describes how breastfeeding is so much more than nutrition, including establishing secure attachments which are fundamental to infant mental health. 

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With a gentle pulsing of the sand, a baby sea turtle emerges from her hatching place. She breathes the salty ocean air and immediately begins her race to the rushing tide. She dodges stealthy crabs and gulls, mounts beach debris and endures what seems like an endless journey. Programmed for survival, she plunges into the abounding ocean, her lifeline.

Worldwide, there are over 70 conservation laws and regulations that protect sea turtles.

Not far from the briny ocean breeze, a mother hears her infant cry as she enters the world outside of the womb for the first time. Placed on her mother’s abdomen, the baby relaxes for several minutes until she begins to awaken. Soon, she makes mouthing and sucking movements signaling her interest in her mother’s breast. She leaps and crawls upward with intermittent periods of rest. When she reaches the breast, her hands become increasingly active and she familiarizes herself with her mother’s nipple. She suckles enjoying her first few sips of thick colostrum. After the first feed, she will rest again in the arms of her mother, her lifeline. [For more information about the 9 Stages visit: http://www.magicalhour.com/aboutus.html]

When a newborn is given the opportunity to practice early survival skills, amazing things happen.

But all too often, the newborn’s programming is interfered with by well-meaning health care professionals and popular, although non evidence-based health care practices.

“Our culture really discredits the importance of early beginnings,” Healthy Children faculty Barb O’Connor, RN, BSN, IBCLC, ANLC says. “If we protect and nurture mothers and infants, that’s going to impact future outcomes.”

Barb O’Connor (back left) pictured with colleagues from HCP and ALPP.

She goes on,  “Mothers and infants really have a synergistic recuperation from birth and if breastfeeding is supported and not interfered with, both parties are able to develop in a manner that leads to positive health outcomes.”

O’Connor discusses several cultural components that make establishing normal, healthy beginnings nearly impossible for families.

Our culture urges independence. Mother and baby are expected to properly function away from one another immediately after birth. Most birthing facilities don’t encourage or appropriately support the important practices of skin to skin contact or even rooming in.

Moreover, mothers are often expected to return to work or school while they are still bleeding from childbirth.

“There are other cultures that really value moms and babies and you can see it in the legislation,” O’Connor says.

Differently, our country provides mothers with zero paid maternity leave.

To be fair, there have been strides made in terms of promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding families in our nation. The Baby-Friendly Initiative (BFI) offers more and more families the opportunity to successfully breastfeed for instance. Particularly, BFI advocates for babies by requiring the facilities to provide the healthiest practices for mom and baby. O’Connor calls skin to skin contact and rooming in essential practices for all babies regardless of feeding method.

Still we have a lot to grasp, especially when it comes to older breastfeeding babies and children.

“Because we focus so much on breastfeeding being nutrition, our culture doesn’t really understand what breastfeeding really is for infants over one,” O’Connor says.  “We don’t understand as a population that nursing becomes a source of joy and communication and a way of life that should only be discontinued as mother and child mutually desire.”

O’Connor is particularly interested in the value of breastfeeding beyond nutrition.

“The delight I witness in the eyes of a baby who is nursing is indescribable; it is pure, unadulterated joy,” she says. “Every baby deserves the right to experience this loveliness.”

And skin to skin and breastfeeding are lovely in so many ways.

Breastfeeding is a stabilizer.

When a mother holds her baby skin to skin to breastfeed, she regulates her baby’s body temperature, heart and breathing rates, stress and glucose levels just to name a few. [For more information see these publications on skin to skin contact.]

O’Connor is fascinated by the findings of Dr. Nils Bergman and KH Nyqvist. Bergman, Nyqvist and colleagues have discovered that if the mothers of low birth weight babies practice Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC), they learn to breastfeed at incredibly young gestational ages. KMC also supports increased brain development and decreased mortality for low birth weight babies.

O’Connor’s daughter Brandy, mother and full-time caregiver of a special needs son who, born at 25 weeks gestation (now 5 years old), spent 110 days in the NICU, will speak at Healthy Children’s upcoming International Breastfeeding Conference about her experience with KMC and breastfeeding. She will share her perspective of the emotional turmoil, hospital practices, and challenges experienced by mothers of infants in the NICU.

“It has taken her a long time to come to a place where she could talk about this,” O’Connor says of Brandy’s experience. “I am extremely excited for my colleagues who work in the NICU to hear her perspective on how the experience affects new mothers”.

Breastfeeding is empowering.

The symbiotic relationship between breastfeeding mother and child and the infant’s programming for survival has a profound impact on the mother’s physical and mental well-being, O’Connor explains.

She continues that a child’s desire to breastfeed for comfort can be empowering. No one else but the mother has the capacity to console an upset child the way she does.

In Breastfeeding: A Feminist Issue, author Penny Van Esterik explains the many other ways breastfeeding is empowering including:  “breastfeeding confirms a woman’s power to control her own body, and challenges the male-dominated medical model and business interests that promote bottle feeding” and ”breastfeeding requires a new definition of women’s work – one that more realistically integrates women’s productive activities.”

Breastfeeding is immunity.

Maternal body flora and milk prime an infant’s immune system in a way that cannot currently be replicated and offers beneficial lifelong effects. O’Connor cites Lars Hanson’s immunology of breast milk research.

“A fully breast-fed infant receives as much as 0.5-1 g of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) antibodies daily, the predominant antibody of human milk,” authors of Breast feeding: Overview and breast milk immunology write. “This can be compared to the production of some 2.5 g of SIgA per day for a 60 kg adult. These SIgA antibodies have been shown to protect against Vibrio cholerae, ETEC, Campylobacter, Shigella and Giardia.”

Breastfeeding is communication.

“If I see a baby who looks anxious or isn’t taking the breast well, it’s an immediate sign that something isn’t right in baby’s life,” O’Connor says.

As stated babies seek the breast for survival, so if baby refuses to breastfeed, they are communicating in a non-verbal way, she continues. Perhaps baby is ill or injured. When circumstances like these arise, it is important that the dyad receive help from a lactation professional who can assist with investigating the problem.

O’Connor reminds lactation professionals that it is always important to practice from a current, evidence-based perspective and to possess appropriate counseling skills.

“Most moms want to breastfeed,” she says. “It’s a matter of figuring out how to fit it in her life.”

Breastfeeding is regulatory.

A breastfed baby is offered control over the amount of milk she ingests whereas a bottle-fed infant’s intake is usually dictated by the amount of milk in its artificial container.

Consequently bottle feeding, regardless of the type of milk, may have future implications on obesity.

“Infants who are bottle-fed in early infancy are more likely to empty the bottle or cup in late infancy than those who are fed directly at the breast,” authors of Do infants fed from bottles lack self-regulation of milk intake compared with directly breastfed infants? conclude.

Breastfeeding is survival.

O’Connor suggests we reevaluate our definition of survival. Survival goes beyond the performance of simple body functions.

“We have to look beyond that at a more encompassing definition,” she says. “Babies who are breastfed have a different potential for intellectual and interpersonal relationships.”

In fact, authors of Breast feeding and intergenerational social mobility: what are the mechanisms? conclude that “Breast feeding increased the odds of upward social mobility and decreased the odds of downward mobility.”

The effect was mediated in part due to stress mechanisms,” O’Connor comments.  “This is really fascinating.”

Breastfeeding has become of international concern because it offers protection against infant mortality. The World Health Organization’s Millenium Development Goals include breastfeeding as a strategy to combat child malnutrition and reduce child mortality.

In “Breastfeeding and Infant-Parent Co-Sleeping as Adaptive Strategies: Are They Protective against SIDS?” included in Breastfeeding: Biocultural Perspectives, James J. McKenna and Nicole J. Bernshaw explore the epidemiological studies that suggest that breastfeeding may be protective against SIDS.

What does breastfeeding mean to you? How else is breastfeeding more than nutrition? Please share your thoughts in the thread below.

 

Other relevant pieces

Field of lactation gains child psychologist

Cheap medicine: laughter

Implications of mother baby separation

Lindsey Brown McCormick’s, PhD, LPCC-S, PMH-C, CLC light bulb moment

[Photo by Andrea Piacquadio]
We consider ourselves life-long learners here at Healthy Children Project. Sometimes learning occurs gradually, and sometimes there are the ‘light bulb’ moments.

We put a call out to our followers to share “Aha!” moments with us. Maybe it was a myth busted during the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC) or maybe it happened during a visit with a dyad.

We also called for stories about your babies’ and children’s ‘light bulb’ moments. When have you seen your little ones’ faces light up in discovery and understanding?

The call for stories is still open! Please send your reflections to info@ourmilkyway.org with “Light Bulb” in the subject line.

Lindsey Brown McCormick, PhD, LPCC-S, PMH-C, CLC is the owner of Women Thrive Counseling & Consulting LLC. This is her light bulb moment. 

——

Dr. McCormick
Used with permission

I did not go into the field of mental health counseling with the goal or intention of working with mothers/birthing people and babies. It was never on my radar as something that clinicians even specialized in. The birth of my daughter changed everything for me. 

I’ve been working in the field of trauma and traumatic stress since 2010. My spouse and I welcomed our daughter, currently our only child, into the world November 2021. I was induced and labored for 22 hours before I was whisked away into the operating room for an emergency cesarean. Though everything was seemingly normal on the surface, between the complications faced in labor and the OR, internally I was far from okay. The spiral of postpartum anxiety had entered the chat. 

It was after we came home, in the stillness of the village that lived so far away, crying on my couch with a cluster feeding newborn, I realized two things: 1) I didn’t know anything about perinatal mental health, and 2) I didn’t know where I could even go to learn. 

In the following weeks, my spouse would arrive home from work and I would dump everything that I had discovered that day onto him. I was so energized, so eager to learn, and I was jumping into the deep end of this new clinical niche. I enrolled in a perinatal mental health training program. Upon completing that, I enrolled in the Certified Lactation Counselor training course. Bridging these disciplines, as a practitioner, just made sense to me. There can be a significant amount of mental health problems that arise from attempting to body feed: anxiety, trauma, and grief, to name a few. And, as an attachment theory and parenting nerd, I absorbed research on skin-to-skin care like a sponge. 

As I’ve continued to specialize in this field, I greatly appreciate the value of blending perinatal mental healthcare and lactation care, the healing benefits of skin-to-skin care after a traumatic birthing experience, and the neuroscience of matrescence and infant (0-3) development. It’s provided me opportunities to learn more about the relationship between my daughter and me. It’s positively influenced my parenting style. It’s positively influenced my approach as a counselor and an educator. There are FEW psychotherapists who have lactation credentials out there, and I feel honored to be one of them. 

 

Weird Findings

 In the era of the International Breastfeeding Conference, Cindy Turner-Maffei and Karin Cadwell would present their beloved Weird Findings segment on the last day of the conference. I always found it delightful and now wistfully reminisce about the session sometimes.

One year, we learned about pink yak milk, spider milk, goat wet nurses and donkeys with “good moral reputations” with the alleged ability to cure distemper and poisoning. That year, I was also introduced to the jaunty tune “I’m a Mammal”.  It was all great fun; entertaining and educational.  

So, this week’s post is my attempt at a Weird Findings collection, a nod to all that is quirky. I landed on quirky as the best word applicable to most of the items below, but quirky and weird are really just umbrella terms for those things that might also be totally awesome, maddening, perplexing and all of the things in between and just outside of these descriptors. 

 

The artificial womb 

My high school biology teacher once asked our class to contemplate a riddle about the Nacirema people. Part of it contained a description of their reproduction which read like an excerpt from a science-fiction novel. Really, it described Americans. 

Reading about the development of an artificial womb to support premature birth had me thinking back to this exercise. 

Like any technology,  great promise and great unknown surround “advancements”. Because this womb is not available to humans yet and because of my overall skepticism, I thought it necessary to point out that we have a means to help very premature babies right this very moment…our bodies.

 

Be inspired, maddened, saddened, weirded out by the remainder of the comments here

 

Exercise and breastfeeding 

This study found that adiponectin concentrations increased in breast milk after high intensity interval training (HIIT). “It has been postulated that higher breast milk adiponectin concentrations may prevent rapid weight gain in infancy,” the authors write. The real-life implications of this discovery?  South China Morning Post’s coverage on the study points out how exercise has physical and mental benefits for mom and baby. 

 

Tomatoes and erectile dysfunction 

Around three minutes into this amazing video, Katie Hinde points out: “When we zoom in on the number of articles just investigating breast milk, we see that we know much more about coffee, wine and tomatoes… We know over twice as much about erectile dysfunction.

I’m not saying we shouldn’t know about those things — I’m a scientist, I think we should know about everything. But that we know so much less about breast milk — the first fluid a young mammal is adapted to consume — should make us angry.” 

 

The disgraceful CMF industry 

As sophisticated as the commercial milk formula industry’s insidious marketing tactics are, they are truly a disgrace in the event of pregnancy loss or stillbirth. The authors of an ABM blog post share the perspectives of mothers who endured pregnancy loss and stillbirth and subsequently received infant formula samples. 

 “‘It feels like a slap in the face, a punch to the gut,’ Caitlin C. says, after discovering formula samples at her door following two second-trimester losses. ‘If [the formula company] somehow knew I was pregnant, couldn’t they also know I’m not anymore?’”

 

Amphibian milk 

It wouldn’t be a proper Weird Findings collection without the inclusion of a creature that challenges our Linnaean classification system. NPR reported that “a species of worm-like amphibian has been caught on camera feeding milk to its young…The creature, known as a caecilian, lives underground. Researchers believe that the animal developed the ability to produce a milk-like substance independently of mammals…” Weird. 

 

Milk composition 

There’s weird and then there’s WEIRD: Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic.   

Klein’s, et al work found variations in milk composition across populations classified by four subsistence patterns: urban-industrialism, rural-shop, horticulturalist-forager or agro-pastoralism. The authors synthesize: “Populations living in closer geographic proximity or having similar subsistence strategies (e.g. agro-pastoralists from Nepal and Namibia) had more similar milk immune protein compositions. Agro-pastoralists had different milk innate immune protein composition from horticulturalist-foragers and urban-industrialists. Acquired immune protein composition differed among all subsistence strategies except horticulturist-foragers and rural-shop.” 

It was found that “When compared with western populations, some of these groups have genetic profiles that favor… immune responses and elevated levels of immune molecules throughout life…” 

 

Microbiome and breast cancer 

Other examples of the microbiome and immune connection come from Nikki Lee’s ponderings.  “This new world of research is astounding!” she shares. 

In Microbiome and Breast Cancer: New Role for an Ancient Population, the authors show “a significant difference in the microbiome composition of nipple aspirate fluid between healthy individuals and patients with BC suggested the potential role of the ductal microbiome in BC incidence.”

In L-asparaginase from human breast milk Lactobacillus reuteri induces apoptosis using therapeutic targets Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 in breast cancer cell line the authors conclude that “Breast milk L. reuteri L-asparaginase induces apoptosis via Cas8 and Cas9 upregulation in the breast cancer cell line. L. reuteri L-asparaginase treatment may be the hopeful approach for the management of breast cancer. Furthermore, the results may highlight the fact that the presence of L-asparaginase-producing L. reuteri isolates in human breast milk may aid in breast cancer improvement or even prevention.”

“Could the microbiome be a reason that breastfeeding reduces the chances of breast cancer?” Lee asks.  

 

Choose and embrace breast milk

The Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health created a mass communication campaign to increase awareness of the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for infants in their first 6 months. This video features a Nigerian celebrity and family. Watch it here

The final element of a Weird Findings segment is song and dance! 

This video is a public health announcement rolled into song by Rodah Amakal, a gospel musician from West Pokot County for the Pokot community in Kenya. Enjoy! 

 

 



Proximity and profit

The red bud in my yard is bursting with magenta. The remnants of nighttime thunderstorms, gems of rain dangle from its branches glistening under late morning sun. There’s a lot of anticipation in our backyard woods; a buzzing of green that will soon become too dense to see the railroad tracks that curve through the neighborhood. 

When I open the grill on one of these beautiful spring days, I’m confronted by a mother mouse perched in her nest. Her black, beady eyes send me shrieking, foolishly and frantically flailing into my house. 

My partner, much less ruffled by the tiny animal, uses the grill utensils to relocate the mother mouse and her nest. Upon removal, he notices that her tiny, pink babies, nearly translucent, are attached to her teats. 

“Oh my god!” he exclaims. “Oh my god, they’re nursing! They’re just hanging on!” And then, minus the flailing, proceeds to freak out, because he is so affected by the fact that he has disturbed a nursing mother and her babies. Despite the assault of grill tongs and  humans giant relative to their size, the mother and her babies remain together, in an act of survival. 

A few days later, at my daughters’ soccer game, my son finds an empty field to kick around his soccer ball. His location and the girls’ game are separated by a small parking lot. I want to finish watching the girls’ game, so my son and I establish a meeting spot. When I go to check on him the first and second time, he is happily occupied, working on what looks like some fancy footwork and big boots. The next time I go to check on him, I scan the landscape, but he is not there. There’s a berm, so I swiftly walk over to see if he’s hidden behind the mound. Still, I don’t see him, so I panic, shouting for him, over and over with no response. 

Perhaps I will reveal too much about my character here…I start to conjure up all of the possibilities: he’s been abducted by a stranger, driven away in a van and I’ll never see him again; he’s been swallowed by the marsh on the other side of the road; he’s wandered off into the woods on the perimeter of the field and wolves will eat him; he’s been coerced by someone in the stands and they’ve snuck off with him somewhere. 

At this point, my heart is beating in my forehead. Blood drains from my arms and legs and they begin to tingle. It feels like I could be staggering from light-headedness, but I manage to make my way over to recheck our meeting spot; he is not there either. I walk up into the bleachers and ask a familiar face if she has seen my son.

“Yep, he’s right there; I’ve been keeping my eye on him,” she points to the other end of the bleachers… not our meeting spot. 

I exhale, thank her quickly, rush to him, embrace him, scold him through trembles. He holds my hand as we make our way to the top of the bleacher seating. He curls his arm around my waist and we sit side-by-side this way watching the reminder of the game together. 

My son is no longer a nursling, but my point in sharing these vignettes is that the connection we have to our children, the instinct to be with them, near them, is mammalian, primal. It’s beautiful and powerful. 

From the start, our infants’ survival depends on proximity. Of the many things that Karin Cadwell and Kajsa Brimdyr have taught me and that have stuck with me is how babies instinctively crawl to the breast, so even when infant feeding hasn’t been a part of the prenatal conversation, or even if a mom has been on the fence about “committing” to breastfeeding, the baby often makes that initial decision, questing to the breast when given the opportunity in uninterrupted skin-to-skin contact after birth. 

“[Babies] are 10,000 years old when they are born,” Nikki Lee has said. “If they’re not next to a heart beat, they are saber-toothed tiger lunch.”

As well as being ancient, breastfeeding is a natural progression in a continuum. Linda Smith once remarked at an International Breastfeeding Conference: “We don’t ask women if they want to deliver their placenta. Why are we asking about breastfeeding?” Smith was not making a point about the removal of choice; instead she was commenting on the fact that breastfeeding is biological

Yet, we find ourselves in a culture that has stripped us of these sacred experiences through marketing and medicalization. We have been acculturated to believe that separation is normal, acculturated to believe that tending to our babies’ basic needs will spoil them, acculturated to believe the only way we can be rested and sane is by separation from our babies, acculturated to believe that we require gadgets to properly raise our children, because somewhere along the line, we started to believe the marketing that nature must be flawed. We fell into the corporate trap, succumbed to their greed, allowed it to dim our instincts. 

Now, the language we use refers to the “benefits” of our mammalian behavior: the benefits of physiological birth, the benefits of skin-to-skin contact, the benefits of breastfeeding. Max Ramirez of IBFAN & MOH Panama has said that “Talking about the advantages of breastfeeding versus the risks of not breastfeeding is like talking about the advantages of breathing instead of the consequences of smoking.”

The idea that without breastfeeding, a baby is significantly disadvantaged, is not in our vernacular. 

As commentator Frn Ange wrote on a The Natural Parent Magazine post “…Proximity is not profitable…” and so we have been forced away from the power of the dyad, the power of our innate abilities as babies and parents. Marketing propaganda created the breast versus bottle wars because it drives profits, further dismantling our power. 

In this Leadership Pittsburgh presentation about “Milk Money,” Todd Wolynn goes as far as to say, “Economics dismantled us as a species.” (He’s referring to formula companies.) 

All is not lost. In fact, Camie Jae Golhammer has said of Indigenous traditions, that they’ve gone dormant rather than have completely died off. 

 

Like the boasting red bud in my yard, these sacred moments during our reproductive years will not always lay dormant and there are bright spots to celebrate. 

Programs like the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative empower families with practices and messaging like: “Every mother has the right to evidence-based information, free from commercial interests to help her decide how to feed her baby and should be equally supported and treated with dignity and respect for her infant feeding decision.” 

Global recognition of the importance of midwifery care came to the forefront late last year when midwifery was inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. This recognition is not only well-deserved by the many, many generations of midwives who have supported and continue to support healthy families, but essential in order to safeguard those in the practice of protecting fundamental human rights and these sacred moments. 

 

Another ray shines as the people at the United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC) do lots and lots of hard work to advance policies that actually allow people to be with their babies. The organization offers a hub for policy action that makes it incredibly simple for citizens to engage and influence change. 

 

Further reading 

Interrupting the mother-child dyad is not the answer to infant safety

Ancient bodies in a modern world 

Mothers matter 

Nuturescience and Kangaroo Mother Care 

The Hidden Pregnancy Experiment which explores anxieties around surveillance.   “As a general rule, these devices don’t lead to better outcomes for the babies they monitor. More often—like social media, which promises connection as a salve for the loneliness created by social media—parenting tech exacerbates, even calls into existence, the parental anxieties that it pledges to soothe.”

Trauma-informed care

More awesome graphics at: https://stores.praeclaruspress.com/free-posters-and-graphics/

Johanna Sargeant’s BA, BEd, IBCLC Mastering Lactation Conversations: Creating Successful and Achievable Care Plans is an excellent reminder of compassionate and effective counseling. Early in her presentation, Sargeant unpacks the perception that lactation care providers (LCP) can sometimes desire breastfeeding “success” more than the clients themselves.

As LCPs, it can be easy to get wrapped up in checklists and targets and “perfect” latches, forgetting about the complexity of the human experience and how infant feeding is inextricably influenced by parents’ lived experiences. Parents must be allowed to define their own terms of success, and as LCPs, we must honor the complexity of their lives. 

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month which is as good a time as any to focus on trauma-informed care, which should be the standard of care for all perinatal services.  

Sexual trauma is common and affects approximately 20 to 25 percent of women, according to  Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Ph.D., IBCLC. 

Image by Nadezhda Moryak

“Abuse survivors can experience a full range of responses to breastfeeding: from really disliking it to finding it tremendously healing, “ she writes in an Uppity Science Chick publication.

All of those many years ago that I completed the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC), one of the most striking bits I took away was learning about the “hands off” approach. I was perplexed that this even needed to be emphasized( though I had experienced a “handsy” LCP after the birth of my first daughter and have so many friends who share similar experiences.)

These cloth breasts are a solution to demonstration without touching people’s bodies. (It is advised to exercise care when dealing with breast models in childbirth and breastfeeding education as the symbolic dismembering of the female body can carry powerful negative messages.)

Jennie Toland’s BSN, RN, CLC article on trauma-informed care reminds us that acknowledging the existence of trauma and its effects is the first step LCPs can take to providing proper care.

“Recognizing signs such as anxiety or emotional numbing can prompt further discussion that builds trust and fosters collaboration and engagement,” Toland writes. “…It can be as simple as asking if someone would prefer the door shut for privacy, positioning ourselves so we are not standing over another person when performing assessments, or verbalizing next steps and asking for consent to move forward…. It can happen within just a few seconds as we ask, ‘What is your preference?’ to provide someone with control over their care.”

[Here’s an older piece that explains how the simple prompt “May I?…” changed the way I view healthcare.]  

Toland writes that trauma-informed care does not need to be complicated, and the approaches she suggests aren’t specific to any one kind of trauma. 

While birth and breastfeeding can be remedial and healing for trauma survivors, these experiences can also be the source of abuse and trauma. 

Dr. Gill Thomson’s work describes this phenomenon. 

Dr. Karen Scott’s work through Birthing Cultural Rigor challenges the reality of maternity care for Black Indigenous People of Color (BIPOC). Indeed,  “We cannot fix the maternal mortality problem without fixing the human rights problem at its core.

There are so many others acknowledging trauma and incorporating compassionate care. In Milwaukee, BOMB Doulas are providing wrap-around care services, thorough screenings like the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) and sensitive, respectful care.

Photo by Mateusz Dach: https://www.pexels.com/photo/photo-of-baby-on-mother-s-arm-4504005/

The White Ribbon Alliance UK offers programming like Safer Beginnings which includes Free From Harm for maternity workers which works to address obstetric violence.  

There are those like Audrey Gentry-Brown, Full Spectrum Birth Sista, Certified Blactation Educator (CBE), Student Midwife, and Medicine Woman in Loudoun County, Va. working to  rewrite cultural norms within her community, introducing “Afrofuturist healing modalities” that reconnect to “ancestral magic.” 

Xavier Dagba’s words embody her work well: “As you focus on clearing your generational trauma, do not forget to claim your generational strengths. Your ancestors gave you more than just wounds.” 

Photo by Serdi Nam: https://www.pexels.com/photo/close-up-of-mother-breastfeeding-baby-19178588/

Shawn Ginwright, a Black clinician, shares a similar ethos in a piece that challenges traditional approaches to trauma-informed care by exploring the distinction between simple ‘treatment’ and true healing.

“A healing centered approach to addressing trauma requires a different question that moves beyond ‘what happened to you’ to ‘what’s right with you’ and views those exposed to trauma as agents in the creation of their own well-being rather than victims of traumatic events,” Ginwright writes. “Healing centered engagement is akin to the South African term ‘Ubuntu’ meaning that humanness is found through our interdependence, collective engagement and service to others. Additionally, healing centered engagement offers an asset driven approach aimed at the holistic restoration of young peoples’ well-being. The healing centered approach comes from the idea that people are not harmed in a vacuum, and well-being comes from participating in transforming the root causes of the harm within institutions.” Essential reading! 

Other relevant resources and articles