Celebrating World Refugee Day

This summer, we are revisiting some of our previous publications as they relate to various celebrations. World Refugee Day was honored on June 20 this year. As such, we are resharing our 2019 piece “Initiative empowers refugee and migrant women”.

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Before Florence Ackey, MSW knew what public health was, she was inquisitive about prevention. Having lost her 12 year old cousin during her young childhood, she found herself perpetually asking “How can I make things better?”

A lifelong investigator and learner, Ackey completed two years of law school in her home country Niger followed by completion of the University of South Florida Master’s of social work. She is currently pursuing a second master’s degree and will begin her doctorate in public health in fall 2019. She recently completed the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC).

Ackey serves as the State Refugee Health Coordinator for the Florida Department of Health Immunization, and Refugee Services. In this position, she connected with a woman who would inspire her to found Refugee and Migrant Women’s Initiative (RAMWI), a not for profit 501(c)(3) which serves and empowers refugee and migrant women during their resettlement.

This particular woman would come to Ackey’s office almost every day and sometimes simply sit with her. Despite a language barrier, Ackey eventually learned that the woman was lonely and depressed; she couldn’t have children, and her husband was out of work.

These circumstances caused great strife, but connecting with Ackey uplifted her spirit.

Mindful of her mental health, Ackey helped cultivate a social circle around this woman. At the same time, Ackey was driven to incorporate a practical component to the gatherings,  so she taught the women to crochet.

“We made a lot of scarves,” she remembers. “We sold them and [the woman] was able to raise enough money to pay for two months rent. It changed her confidence.”

Ultimately, their informal, weekend meetings grew too large for home meetings, so RAMWI was created. Today RAMWI, run entirely by volunteers, has served over 400 families over roughly six years.

“It’s just beautiful to see how far we’ve come,” Ackey says.

Refugee and migrant women suffer from things like trauma, discrimination and anxiety.

Ackey explains: Often the story goes that the woman arrives with her husband and children from their home country; the husband finds work and grows a social life and the children go to school and make friends. In the meantime, the woman is left alone at home, sometimes too uneasy about the unfamiliarity of their new settlement to leave the confines of her home. Even when her family returns from their daily routines, she’s further isolated because their experiences become less and less common and relatable.

In light of this phenomenon, RAMWI offers corresponding, age-appropriate workshops for mothers and children in order to bridge conversation topics.

“The mom is no longer left alone; she has something she can contribute,” Ackey explains.

RAMWI offers its social, support network and classes and workshopsin a way that allows women to integrate into their new communities while still preserving their cultural identity. For instance, RAMWI’s Annual International Fashion Show during Welcoming Week offers refugees and migrant women the opportunity to share pride in their culture through clothing.

Participants pose during the Annual International Fashion Show during Welcoming Week
Photo courtesy of RAMWI

The show usually represents about 48 countries with over 80 participants.

Monthly support groups cover topics like women’s health, grief and coping mechanism, U.S. healthcare system and resources, nutrition, safety, domestic violence, disaster preparedness, life balance and personal finances among other topics.

Ackey emphasizes that female empowerment doesn’t need to be granted externally.

“Women have the power within in them to freely give,” she begins.

She goes on to describe a visual installation she’ll present at an upcoming RAMWI session to illustrate this idea.

Ackey asks participants questions like ‘Have you helped someone without anything in return?’ or ‘Have you paid a genuine compliment to someone?’ Each time a participant answers ‘yes’, she pokes a hole with a thumbtack into a blank board. The holes initially appear to be randomly placed, but when a light shines through the back of the board, the silhouette of a decorated city appears. The installation represents the seemingly small acts of women impacting entire communities.

This month, RAMWI members will assemble 240 care packages for the homeless.

RAMWI participants at a monthly meeting
Photo courtesy of RAMWI

When it comes to infant feeding, migrant women often look to formula as a status symbol. It’s a mindset Ackey encounters often, but she says the lactation counselor training course has equipped her to become a better healthy infant feeding advocate.

Ackey has also found that hospital staff generally do not take the time to discuss and educate migrant women about breastfeeding. She predicts this is sometimes due to language barriers.

“It’s easier to give them formula and go,” she explains.

Mothers are often happy with the “gift” of formula and all of the “swag” that can come along with formula feeding.

Surely birth and infant feeding culture varies greatly among the women in RAMWI, but Ackey has found that immigrant women tend to share the common value of a strong mother -child bond which stems from their collective upbringing, she explains.

Mother and child, one of Ackey’s favorite photos
Photo courtesy of RAMWI

She shares that this “it takes a village” mentality is reflected in the way they feed their babies.

“Women take care of all the children,” says Ackey.

In some cases, women breastfeed children that are not biologically their own in the spirit of shared duties, but for survival in other circumstances.

“Women breastfeed other children especially from some African countries,” Ackey begins.

She recalls one woman who adopted a child she picked up on the road next to the dead body of his mother. Ackey makes clear this imagery isn’t representative of the entire refugee population, but it is a story that embodies how the women she works with will raise any child.

Amidst the tragedy and hardship that many of the families have faced, there’s so much beauty and hope within RAMWI.

“Hope can, and will heal the world,” its mantra.

One volunteer said:  “The thing I love the most is the environment of support and empowerment that RAMWI creates for women from all over the world…the women learn from each other…form a bond that as women is something that connects you no matter where you are from.”

For Ackey, success is achieved when a woman makes a choice because she has been fully informed and she’s aware of all of her options.

Visit https://www.ramwi.org/ for more information. Connect with RAMWI on Facebook here.

Other relevant pieces

Prioritizing infant and young child feeding in emergencies during National Preparedness Month and beyond

To know is to do: retired nurse dedicates time to humanitarian aid in East Africa bringing awareness to the paradox of direness and vibrancy

A collection of stories by and about those in the AANHPI community

Caesarean Doulas: Implications for Breastfeeding at 24th Annual International Breastfeeding Conference & Nutrition and Nurture in Infancy and Childhood: Bio-Cultural Perspectives

Breastfeeding, peace and justice

Babywearing as a public health initiative

22 more actions in 2022

 In our third installment of 22 in 2022, we bring you 22 MORE Actions in 2022, because there is always work to do. 

Source: United States Breastfeeding Committee

22 in 2022 was inspired by Life Kit’s 22 Tips for 2022, and we hope it provides inspiration for you to forge forward with this important work.

  1. Learn about the Girls’ Bill of Rights. Empowered women start with empowered girls. 
  2. Watch a film centered around maternal child health like  A Doula Story, The Milky Way breastfeeding documentary, Chocolate Milk, Zero Weeks, Legacy Power Voice: Movements in Black Midwifery or register to play Factuality
  3. Identify and network with an individual or organization with a mission that intersects with maternal child health. This shouldn’t be a challenge… “All roads lead to breastfeeding!” (A popular adage at Healthy Children Project.)  Often, we find ourselves preaching to the choir, shouting in an echo chamber, whatever you want to call it. It’s time to reach beyond our normal audience. 
  4. Follow Dr. Magdelena Whoolery on social media to stay up to date on strategies that combat the multi-billion dollar artificial baby milk industry. 
  5. Sign on to USBC’s organizational letter in support of the DEMAND Act of 2022.
  6. Congratulate, encourage or simply smile at a mother. 
  7. Explore White Ribbon Alliance’s work around respectful care. You can start by watching this poignant webinar Healthcare Professionals Honoring Women’s Demands for Respectful Care
  8. Read The First Food System: The importance of breastfeeding in global food systems discussions.
  9. Read Lactation in quarantine: The (in)visibility of human milk feeding during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States
  10. Sign this petition to stop unethical formula research on babies. 
  11. Check out the updated Center for WorkLife Law’s Winning New Rights for Lactating Workers: An Advocate’s Toolkit
  12. Register for a free PQI Innovation webinar.
  13. Read the revised Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) Clinical Protocol #2: Guidelines for Birth Hospitalization Discharge of Breastfeeding Dyads here
  14. Gear up for World Breastfeeding Week 2022 and National Breastfeeding Month. 
  15. Check out this NIH project Breastmilk Ecology: Genesis of Infant Nutrition (BEGIN) Project which seeks a deeper understanding of human milk biology to address ongoing and emerging questions about infant feeding practices.  
  16. Learn about the Melanated Mammary Atlas.
  17. Consider becoming a ROSE community transformer or share the opportunity with someone who may be interested. 
  18. Get familiar with WHO’s recent report How the marketing of formula milk influences our decisions on infant feeding and disseminate the corresponding infographics
  19. Sensitize journalists and the media to stimulate public debate on the links between breastfeeding and the climate crisis as suggested by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA).
  20. Get to know how breastfeeding and proper nutrition fits into the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
  21. Access one of the National Institute for Children’s Health Quality’s (NICHQ) webinars on breastfeeding, infant health, early childhood or health equity here
  22. Engage with the PUMP Act Toolkit! This is crucial, time-sensitive work that will make a huge difference for families across our nation.

Read our original list of 22 Actions here and our celebration of unsung sheroes/heroes here

Musings on unity beyond National Breastfeeding Month

This year’s National Breastfeeding Month (NBM) celebration has come to an end, but our momentum as maternal child health advocates– striving for equitable care for all– powers on. 

The 2020 NBM theme, Many Voices United, called on us to come together to identify and implement the policy and system changes that are needed to ensure that all families have the support and resources they need in order to feed their babies healthily. 

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
Colorful Hands 1 of 3 / George Fox students Annabelle Wombacher, Jared Mar, Sierra Ratcliff and Benjamin Cahoon collaborated on the mural. / Article: https://www.orartswatch.org/painting-the-town-in-newberg/

Achieving this shared goal requires daily self-work and individual introspection so that our collective can be as effective as ever. No matter how socially-conscious, open-minded, anti-racist, (insert adjective), we think we may be, we still have learned biases and prejudices that require near constant attention. Much like I remind my children to brush their teeth every morning and every night, as a white, binary woman, I must remind myself to examine my biases and my privilege daily.  

With NBM’s theme of unity in mind, this Upworthy video features an art installation that demonstrates our society’s interconnectedness. With a piece of string, the installation shows an intricate, densely-woven web created by individuals wrapping thread around 32 poles with identifiers arranged in a circle. 

“You can see that even though we all have different experiences and we all identify in different ways…We are really one,” the project’s creator says in the video. 

The sentiment and the product are truly beautiful and fascinating. While appreciating the beauty of unity, it’s important to keep our critical thinking and progressive attitude sharp, refraining from slipping into too comfortable a space where change cannot happen.  

Recently, I’ve seen a few statements on unity circulating social media that I’d like to embrace with a “Yes!” Instead, I find myself reacting, “Yes! But…” 

My worry is that these well-intentioned mantras we live by– much like some might argue certain microaggressions are well-intentioned– are also dismissive. 

  1. We all bleed the same blood. 
  1. Children are not born racist.
  1. I will teach my child to love your child. Period. 

Let’s break those down starting with “We all bleed the same blood.”  Some things to consider:

First, Ashley May for The Thirbly writes,

“Black breasts do not exist separate from Black bodies and the situated existence we navigate in this world nor the racialized experience of motherhood. Racism and classism intertwine to act as a containment, working to make some of us feel as if we are walking in quicksand. Add to this the complexities of new motherhood and the needs of the postpartum body and now we have a cocktail for failure. Literal milk plugs. So, although her precious body may be able to produce milk, her situation prevents her and her baby from receiving it. Even the intention to breastfeed cannot save the milk of the mother who cannot find time for pump breaks as she works the night shift as a security guard. Or, perhaps she cannot figure out why pumping is not working, but she doesn’t have the time to seek the educational or financial resources to help her problem solve.” (underline added by OMW) 

Racism affects People of Color (POC) at a cellular level. Studies show that the experience of racial discrimination accelerates the shortening of telomeres (the repetitive sequences of DNA at the ends of chromosomes that protect the cell) and ultimately contributes to an increase in people’s risks of developing diseases. 

It’s epigenetics; the environments POC of are growing in affect their biology.  

Children are not born racist, but white children are born into a racist society that they will benefit from. 

From the very beginning, white children have a better chance of survival than Children of Color; African Americans have 2.3 times the infant mortality rate as non-Hispanic whites

What’s more, Black children are three times more likely to die when cared for by white doctors, while the mortality rate for white babies is largely unaffected by the doctor’s race, a recent study found. 

White children are born into being part of the problem and just the same, can be part of equitable solutions. 

I will teach my child to love your child. Period. 

Love is action, and even if it’s easier said than done, there are so many ways to teach our children about race, inequities and injustice. Afterall, “If Black children are ‘old enough’ to experience racism then white children are ‘old enough’ to learn about it.” – Blair Amadeus Imani

  • Be careful what you say. As a young girl on my way to ballet class one day, my mom, while locking the car doors,  pointed out the barred doors and boarded windows in the neighborhood we rolled through. 

“That’s how you know this is not a safe neighborhood,” my mom warned me. 

No questions asked, I noted the building facades, and then I noted the Black people. Because there wasn’t any further conversation, I made the connection that Black people must be “not safe” and ultimately, that there must be something wrong with Black people if they’re confined to neighborhoods “like this.” 

Imagine the impact we could make if we showed our children that there is nothing inherently wrong with Black people that ending racism can’t solve.

As a nation we are apathetic, made apparent by a recent poll. The survey shows that only 30 percent of white people have taken concrete action to better understand racial issues after George Floyd’s killing. 

The poll also shows that White Americans are also the least likely to support the Black Lives Matter movement, with 47 percent expressing support.

Is it because we don’t claim it as our problem? Is it because we misunderstand the problem? Is it because it’s easier to point fingers at others than ourselves? 

I’d like to leave you with this video of writer Kimberly Jones where she provides a brief history of the American economy told through an analogy using the board game Monopoly. I urge you to watch it, and then watch it again, and again, and again. 

There is no time for complacency within these truly abhorrent systems. When we start to lose sight of that, envision the tangle of yarn from the aforementioned unity art installation and remember that vastly different experiences are networked together.