Medical librarian to perinatal services manager, LCTC participant strives to improve Black maternal health

Christian Minter, MSLIS is the eldest of twelve siblings. Her mother gave birth both at home and in the hospital, and she breastfed all of her children, so Minter says she was accustomed to seeing the full range of options when it comes to maternity care.

About ten years ago, Minter became interested in maternal and child health after hearing friends share their often less than ideal birth experiences. She discovered that informed choice was a rarity in their care. As Minter learned more about the disparities in birth outcomes among Black women and babies, she became passionate about working to improve Black maternal health.

At the time, Minter worked as a medical librarian supporting families with access to health information. 

“There was only so much I could do as a librarian to support maternal and child health,” Minter reflects. 

Her work evolved and in 2019, Minter began her public health graduate studies. As a project for the course Introduction to Health Disparities and Health Equity at University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health, Minter created a beautiful mini-documentary about doula care for Black women. 

Minter also served as the manager of maternal infant health initiatives for March of Dimes Nebraska, Black maternal health organizer for I Be Black Girl and collaborated on the Omaha Reproductive Well-being Project

Now, Minter works as the perinatal services manager at Community of Hope in Washington, D.C. She is currently on maternity leave with her first baby who is three months old and cooed sweetly during our phone call. 

“Breastfeeding him has been an eye opening experience,” Minter shares.  “It’s one thing to talk about maternal and child health, and another to experience it firsthand. It’s giving me a greater appreciation of the breastfeeding journey of families.  It’s  increased my passion to support other families.” 

Minter shares that she had her eye on the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC) for quite some time, but could never sacrifice the time away from work for the week-long, in-person training. As one of the most recent awardees of the Accessing the Milky Way scholarship, Minter says she’s enjoying the online, self-paced format and learning about the physiology of breastfeeding. 

Minter plans to use her training to support their patient population at Community of Hope. Additionally, she says she’d like to make lactation education and support more accessible to those living in Prince George County, Md., as families often need to travel outside the county for community-based support. 

Minter encourages readers to follow Community of Hope on social media. Their breastfeeding classes are open to the general public. The organization also accepts donations of supplies for families like diapers, maternity clothing and books. Check out their wishlist here and learn about other ways to support their work here.