Celebrating Infant Mental Health Awareness Week

This summer, we are revisiting some of our previous publications as they relate to various national celebrations. 

This week is Infant Mental Health Awareness Week, so we are re-sharing “Breastfeeding is…” a 2014 piece. Based on an interview with Barb O’Connor, this piece describes how breastfeeding is so much more than nutrition, including establishing secure attachments which are fundamental to infant mental health. 

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With a gentle pulsing of the sand, a baby sea turtle emerges from her hatching place. She breathes the salty ocean air and immediately begins her race to the rushing tide. She dodges stealthy crabs and gulls, mounts beach debris and endures what seems like an endless journey. Programmed for survival, she plunges into the abounding ocean, her lifeline.

Worldwide, there are over 70 conservation laws and regulations that protect sea turtles.

Not far from the briny ocean breeze, a mother hears her infant cry as she enters the world outside of the womb for the first time. Placed on her mother’s abdomen, the baby relaxes for several minutes until she begins to awaken. Soon, she makes mouthing and sucking movements signaling her interest in her mother’s breast. She leaps and crawls upward with intermittent periods of rest. When she reaches the breast, her hands become increasingly active and she familiarizes herself with her mother’s nipple. She suckles enjoying her first few sips of thick colostrum. After the first feed, she will rest again in the arms of her mother, her lifeline. [For more information about the 9 Stages visit: http://www.magicalhour.com/aboutus.html]

When a newborn is given the opportunity to practice early survival skills, amazing things happen.

But all too often, the newborn’s programming is interfered with by well-meaning health care professionals and popular, although non evidence-based health care practices.

“Our culture really discredits the importance of early beginnings,” Healthy Children faculty Barb O’Connor, RN, BSN, IBCLC, ANLC says. “If we protect and nurture mothers and infants, that’s going to impact future outcomes.”

Barb O’Connor (back left) pictured with colleagues from HCP and ALPP.

She goes on,  “Mothers and infants really have a synergistic recuperation from birth and if breastfeeding is supported and not interfered with, both parties are able to develop in a manner that leads to positive health outcomes.”

O’Connor discusses several cultural components that make establishing normal, healthy beginnings nearly impossible for families.

Our culture urges independence. Mother and baby are expected to properly function away from one another immediately after birth. Most birthing facilities don’t encourage or appropriately support the important practices of skin to skin contact or even rooming in.

Moreover, mothers are often expected to return to work or school while they are still bleeding from childbirth.

“There are other cultures that really value moms and babies and you can see it in the legislation,” O’Connor says.

Differently, our country provides mothers with zero paid maternity leave.

To be fair, there have been strides made in terms of promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding families in our nation. The Baby-Friendly Initiative (BFI) offers more and more families the opportunity to successfully breastfeed for instance. Particularly, BFI advocates for babies by requiring the facilities to provide the healthiest practices for mom and baby. O’Connor calls skin to skin contact and rooming in essential practices for all babies regardless of feeding method.

Still we have a lot to grasp, especially when it comes to older breastfeeding babies and children.

“Because we focus so much on breastfeeding being nutrition, our culture doesn’t really understand what breastfeeding really is for infants over one,” O’Connor says.  “We don’t understand as a population that nursing becomes a source of joy and communication and a way of life that should only be discontinued as mother and child mutually desire.”

O’Connor is particularly interested in the value of breastfeeding beyond nutrition.

“The delight I witness in the eyes of a baby who is nursing is indescribable; it is pure, unadulterated joy,” she says. “Every baby deserves the right to experience this loveliness.”

And skin to skin and breastfeeding are lovely in so many ways.

Breastfeeding is a stabilizer.

When a mother holds her baby skin to skin to breastfeed, she regulates her baby’s body temperature, heart and breathing rates, stress and glucose levels just to name a few. [For more information see these publications on skin to skin contact.]

O’Connor is fascinated by the findings of Dr. Nils Bergman and KH Nyqvist. Bergman, Nyqvist and colleagues have discovered that if the mothers of low birth weight babies practice Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC), they learn to breastfeed at incredibly young gestational ages. KMC also supports increased brain development and decreased mortality for low birth weight babies.

O’Connor’s daughter Brandy, mother and full-time caregiver of a special needs son who, born at 25 weeks gestation (now 5 years old), spent 110 days in the NICU, will speak at Healthy Children’s upcoming International Breastfeeding Conference about her experience with KMC and breastfeeding. She will share her perspective of the emotional turmoil, hospital practices, and challenges experienced by mothers of infants in the NICU.

“It has taken her a long time to come to a place where she could talk about this,” O’Connor says of Brandy’s experience. “I am extremely excited for my colleagues who work in the NICU to hear her perspective on how the experience affects new mothers”.

Breastfeeding is empowering.

The symbiotic relationship between breastfeeding mother and child and the infant’s programming for survival has a profound impact on the mother’s physical and mental well-being, O’Connor explains.

She continues that a child’s desire to breastfeed for comfort can be empowering. No one else but the mother has the capacity to console an upset child the way she does.

In Breastfeeding: A Feminist Issue, author Penny Van Esterik explains the many other ways breastfeeding is empowering including:  “breastfeeding confirms a woman’s power to control her own body, and challenges the male-dominated medical model and business interests that promote bottle feeding” and ”breastfeeding requires a new definition of women’s work – one that more realistically integrates women’s productive activities.”

Breastfeeding is immunity.

Maternal body flora and milk prime an infant’s immune system in a way that cannot currently be replicated and offers beneficial lifelong effects. O’Connor cites Lars Hanson’s immunology of breast milk research.

“A fully breast-fed infant receives as much as 0.5-1 g of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) antibodies daily, the predominant antibody of human milk,” authors of Breast feeding: Overview and breast milk immunology write. “This can be compared to the production of some 2.5 g of SIgA per day for a 60 kg adult. These SIgA antibodies have been shown to protect against Vibrio cholerae, ETEC, Campylobacter, Shigella and Giardia.”

Breastfeeding is communication.

“If I see a baby who looks anxious or isn’t taking the breast well, it’s an immediate sign that something isn’t right in baby’s life,” O’Connor says.

As stated babies seek the breast for survival, so if baby refuses to breastfeed, they are communicating in a non-verbal way, she continues. Perhaps baby is ill or injured. When circumstances like these arise, it is important that the dyad receive help from a lactation professional who can assist with investigating the problem.

O’Connor reminds lactation professionals that it is always important to practice from a current, evidence-based perspective and to possess appropriate counseling skills.

“Most moms want to breastfeed,” she says. “It’s a matter of figuring out how to fit it in her life.”

Breastfeeding is regulatory.

A breastfed baby is offered control over the amount of milk she ingests whereas a bottle-fed infant’s intake is usually dictated by the amount of milk in its artificial container.

Consequently bottle feeding, regardless of the type of milk, may have future implications on obesity.

“Infants who are bottle-fed in early infancy are more likely to empty the bottle or cup in late infancy than those who are fed directly at the breast,” authors of Do infants fed from bottles lack self-regulation of milk intake compared with directly breastfed infants? conclude.

Breastfeeding is survival.

O’Connor suggests we reevaluate our definition of survival. Survival goes beyond the performance of simple body functions.

“We have to look beyond that at a more encompassing definition,” she says. “Babies who are breastfed have a different potential for intellectual and interpersonal relationships.”

In fact, authors of Breast feeding and intergenerational social mobility: what are the mechanisms? conclude that “Breast feeding increased the odds of upward social mobility and decreased the odds of downward mobility.”

The effect was mediated in part due to stress mechanisms,” O’Connor comments.  “This is really fascinating.”

Breastfeeding has become of international concern because it offers protection against infant mortality. The World Health Organization’s Millenium Development Goals include breastfeeding as a strategy to combat child malnutrition and reduce child mortality.

In “Breastfeeding and Infant-Parent Co-Sleeping as Adaptive Strategies: Are They Protective against SIDS?” included in Breastfeeding: Biocultural Perspectives, James J. McKenna and Nicole J. Bernshaw explore the epidemiological studies that suggest that breastfeeding may be protective against SIDS.

What does breastfeeding mean to you? How else is breastfeeding more than nutrition? Please share your thoughts in the thread below.

 

Other relevant pieces

Field of lactation gains child psychologist

Cheap medicine: laughter

Implications of mother baby separation

Weird Findings

 In the era of the International Breastfeeding Conference, Cindy Turner-Maffei and Karin Cadwell would present their beloved Weird Findings segment on the last day of the conference. I always found it delightful and now wistfully reminisce about the session sometimes.

One year, we learned about pink yak milk, spider milk, goat wet nurses and donkeys with “good moral reputations” with the alleged ability to cure distemper and poisoning. That year, I was also introduced to the jaunty tune “I’m a Mammal”.  It was all great fun; entertaining and educational.  

So, this week’s post is my attempt at a Weird Findings collection, a nod to all that is quirky. I landed on quirky as the best word applicable to most of the items below, but quirky and weird are really just umbrella terms for those things that might also be totally awesome, maddening, perplexing and all of the things in between and just outside of these descriptors. 

 

The artificial womb 

My high school biology teacher once asked our class to contemplate a riddle about the Nacirema people. Part of it contained a description of their reproduction which read like an excerpt from a science-fiction novel. Really, it described Americans. 

Reading about the development of an artificial womb to support premature birth had me thinking back to this exercise. 

Like any technology,  great promise and great unknown surround “advancements”. Because this womb is not available to humans yet and because of my overall skepticism, I thought it necessary to point out that we have a means to help very premature babies right this very moment…our bodies.

 

Be inspired, maddened, saddened, weirded out by the remainder of the comments here

 

Exercise and breastfeeding 

This study found that adiponectin concentrations increased in breast milk after high intensity interval training (HIIT). “It has been postulated that higher breast milk adiponectin concentrations may prevent rapid weight gain in infancy,” the authors write. The real-life implications of this discovery?  South China Morning Post’s coverage on the study points out how exercise has physical and mental benefits for mom and baby. 

 

Tomatoes and erectile dysfunction 

Around three minutes into this amazing video, Katie Hinde points out: “When we zoom in on the number of articles just investigating breast milk, we see that we know much more about coffee, wine and tomatoes… We know over twice as much about erectile dysfunction.

I’m not saying we shouldn’t know about those things — I’m a scientist, I think we should know about everything. But that we know so much less about breast milk — the first fluid a young mammal is adapted to consume — should make us angry.” 

 

The disgraceful CMF industry 

As sophisticated as the commercial milk formula industry’s insidious marketing tactics are, they are truly a disgrace in the event of pregnancy loss or stillbirth. The authors of an ABM blog post share the perspectives of mothers who endured pregnancy loss and stillbirth and subsequently received infant formula samples. 

 “‘It feels like a slap in the face, a punch to the gut,’ Caitlin C. says, after discovering formula samples at her door following two second-trimester losses. ‘If [the formula company] somehow knew I was pregnant, couldn’t they also know I’m not anymore?’”

 

Amphibian milk 

It wouldn’t be a proper Weird Findings collection without the inclusion of a creature that challenges our Linnaean classification system. NPR reported that “a species of worm-like amphibian has been caught on camera feeding milk to its young…The creature, known as a caecilian, lives underground. Researchers believe that the animal developed the ability to produce a milk-like substance independently of mammals…” Weird. 

 

Milk composition 

There’s weird and then there’s WEIRD: Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic.   

Klein’s, et al work found variations in milk composition across populations classified by four subsistence patterns: urban-industrialism, rural-shop, horticulturalist-forager or agro-pastoralism. The authors synthesize: “Populations living in closer geographic proximity or having similar subsistence strategies (e.g. agro-pastoralists from Nepal and Namibia) had more similar milk immune protein compositions. Agro-pastoralists had different milk innate immune protein composition from horticulturalist-foragers and urban-industrialists. Acquired immune protein composition differed among all subsistence strategies except horticulturist-foragers and rural-shop.” 

It was found that “When compared with western populations, some of these groups have genetic profiles that favor… immune responses and elevated levels of immune molecules throughout life…” 

 

Microbiome and breast cancer 

Other examples of the microbiome and immune connection come from Nikki Lee’s ponderings.  “This new world of research is astounding!” she shares. 

In Microbiome and Breast Cancer: New Role for an Ancient Population, the authors show “a significant difference in the microbiome composition of nipple aspirate fluid between healthy individuals and patients with BC suggested the potential role of the ductal microbiome in BC incidence.”

In L-asparaginase from human breast milk Lactobacillus reuteri induces apoptosis using therapeutic targets Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 in breast cancer cell line the authors conclude that “Breast milk L. reuteri L-asparaginase induces apoptosis via Cas8 and Cas9 upregulation in the breast cancer cell line. L. reuteri L-asparaginase treatment may be the hopeful approach for the management of breast cancer. Furthermore, the results may highlight the fact that the presence of L-asparaginase-producing L. reuteri isolates in human breast milk may aid in breast cancer improvement or even prevention.”

“Could the microbiome be a reason that breastfeeding reduces the chances of breast cancer?” Lee asks.  

 

Choose and embrace breast milk

The Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health created a mass communication campaign to increase awareness of the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for infants in their first 6 months. This video features a Nigerian celebrity and family. Watch it here

The final element of a Weird Findings segment is song and dance! 

This video is a public health announcement rolled into song by Rodah Amakal, a gospel musician from West Pokot County for the Pokot community in Kenya. Enjoy! 

 

 



Changing the culture of mother baby separation in one Northeastern hospital

“I got to touch him once and they took him right away from me,” Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center labor and delivery nurse Jennifer Wickett says, remembering the birth of her first child 19 years ago.

Wickett desired non-medicated births, but her three children ended up being born via cesarean sections for various reasons. Wickett’s personal birth experiences coincided with her early professional life, working at a hospital in Massachusetts as a labor and delivery nurse.

At the time, she explains, the process was this: the baby was born,  taken to the warmer, vitals and weight were recorded. The baby was wrapped in a blanket and held next to mom’s face for five to ten minutes and then taken to the newborn nursery.

Skin-to-skin in the OR, Healthy Children Project

“I hated that for my patients and I hated that for me,” Wickett says.

So Wickett singularly started changing that culture of mother baby separation.
Now, at Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center, Wickett attends about 95 percent of the c-sections, and she says she was able to “take control.”

“[Initially] I wasn’t tucking baby in skin-to-skin, but I was putting baby on top of mom with the support person helping hold the baby,” Wickett explains.
She deemed it the Wickett hold: baby placed chest down on mom with knees tucked under the left breast and baby’s head on the right breast.

Attending a Kangaroo Mother Care Conference in Cleveland galvanized her efforts: the evidence clearly supported skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth and beyond.  Fellow nurses, anesthesiologists and other team members were resistant, but Wickett and a few other fellow nurses who created the Kangaroo Care Committee kept at it, always leading with kindness and communication. Rather than approaching the process with an “I have to do this” agenda, Wickett involves and acknowledges all of the participants in the room.

For instance, to the mother, she asks permission while also explaining the importance of skin-to-skin contact.

“They’re in hook line and sinker when I explain that their body regulates their baby’s temperature,” Wickett explains. “They don’t want to give that baby up; they are not letting that baby go.”

To the anesthesiologist, she facilitates open communication. Wickett lets them know that she assumes responsibility for the baby. “Are you good?” she often checks in with the anesthesiologist, while minding their space to work safely and efficiently.

Wickett  makes certain to involve the partner in their baby’s care, asking them to keep a watchful eye over mom and baby.

Photo by Jonathan Borba

Just about half of the babies she sees begin breastfeeding in the OR, she reports. From the OR, babies are kept on their mothers’ chests as they’re transferred to the recovery room, continuing the opportunity to breastfeed. All in all, Wickett says that babies born by c-section at her hospital spend more time skin-to-skin than those who are born vaginally.

After a vaginal birth, eager nurses often disturb skin-to-skin contact to complete their screenings and documentation. Excited partners wanting to hold their baby tend to do the same.

In the OR though, Wickett says there are at least 30 minutes without these disruptions.  Once mother and baby are transferred to the PACU, mothers report decreased pain when skin-to-skin is practiced.

What’s more, Wickett reports hearing often “This baby is such a good breastfeeder!” because the babies have an opportunity to initiate breastfeeding within the first two hours of life.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that immediate, continuous, uninterrupted skin-to-skin contact should be the standard of care for all mothers and all babies (from 1000 grams with experienced staff if assistance is needed), after all modes of birth. The recent Skin-to-skin contact after birth: Developing a research and practice guideline synthesizes the evidence. [Read more here.]

Skin-to-skin, Healthy Children Project

Wickett and seven other colleagues had the opportunity to complete the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC) last year.
While she says she would have loved to have been able to take the course in-person, Wickett still found the material and resources “fabulous.”

For the past four years, there’s been a vacancy in the perinatal coordinator position at her hospital, so Wickett hopes that her new credentials will allow her to fill the need.  In the meantime, Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center offers outpatient lactation visits. The center’s breastfeeding support groups halted during the height of COVID and have yet to resume; Wickett reports that they are trying to bring those back virtually.

Additionally, Maine residents have access to the CradleME Program which
offers home-based services to anyone pregnant up to one year postpartum.
In partnership with the Mothers’ Milk Bank Northeast , Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center became the first milk depot in the Bangor area.

You can read more Our Milky Way coverage on skin-to-skin after cesarean birth in  Skin-to-skin in the operating room after cesarean birth , The Association Between Common Labor Drugs and Suckling When Skin-to-Skin During the First Hour After Birth , and Skin to skin in the OR.

Also check out Skin to Skin in the First Hour After Birth; Practical Advice for Staff after Vaginal and Cesarean Birth Skin to Skin.

Find some beautiful KMC imagery here.

To know is to do: retired nurse dedicates time to humanitarian aid in East Africa bringing awareness to the paradox of direness and vibrancy

Some days Susan Gold, RN, BSN, ACRN misses her ignorance. Since 2003, Gold has embarked on over 30 trips to various locations in East Africa where she teaches sexual and reproductive health and offers humanitarian aid.

Recalling one of her first visits to a clinic in Nairobi, Kenya, Gold describes a young mother, around 18-years-old, who arrived holding her severely malnourished infant against her breasts infected with such severe mastitis that her skin had split. This mother had been thrown out of her home for being HIV-positive and was breastfeeding and formula feeding her baby.

[Some background: Infant feeding has been complicated by the HIV epidemic. In the early 2000s, Gold explains that HIV-positive women were taught to formula feed to lower the risk of transmission to their babies, but with little to no access to clean water, babies were becoming severely ill. What’s more, in societies where breastfeeding is the norm, exclusive formula feeding is often an indication of one’s HIV status, which remains highly stigmatized. And formula is expensive, so many mothers choose mixed feeding, increasing the rate of HIV transmission, because formula irritates the GI system and gives the virus a pathway. By 2010, WHO issued new recommendations that stated that all mothers who tested positive should receive effective antiretroviral treatment (ART) which could lower risk of transmission during exclusive breastfeeding to virtually zero. In 2016, WHO extended the recommended duration of breastfeeding for HIV-positive mothers to 24 months. Effectiveness is dependent on consistency though, and Gold explains that mothers can develop resistance because there isn’t always access to ART.]

Gold was able to give the mother antibiotics, but the care that she and her infant required was beyond what Gold could offer. Considering the dyad’s condition and Gold’s limited resources, she says she’s certain that they died.

Reflecting on the suffering she witnessed and lives lost, that’s when Gold misses her ignorance most, but she says, “To know is to do.”

“For me it’s not a news story I can ignore, it’s names and faces,” she remarks.

In 2007, Gold received a Fulbright Grant to evaluate a reproductive health curriculum for HIV-positive adolescents. In 2017, she was awarded a Mandela Washington Fellowship Reciprocal Exchange Award to collaborate with Sicily Mburu, a Kenyan physician who co-founded AIDS No More. [Read more: https://ghi.wisc.edu/talking-health-out-loud-how-volunteering-led-to-life-saving-strategies-for-teens/]

Most recently, Gold spent several weeks in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on a Nelson Mandela Fellowship Reciprocal Exchange Fellowship Grant where she partnered with Dr. Omari Mahiza, a pediatrician at Amana Regional Referral Hospital, focusing their efforts on combating pediatric malnutrition and education on family planning.

 

Shattering stereotypes 

Gold has found that most Americans hold a “shallow view” of the continent. Her frustration with the stereotypes associated with Africa runs deep.

“It’s either starving children or a safari,” she begins. “It’s so painful for me to see that displayed so many times. There is such a tendency [in America] to dehumanize people who are not like us… We set ourselves as the standard. Their culture is not a failed attempt to be our culture. Success doesn’t have to look like us or be measured against us.”

Alongside her humanitarian work, Gold hopes to shatter the stereotypes, to bring awareness to the paradox of direness and vibrancy in East Africa.

Gold reminisces: “I love the African sun on my face, the bright colors and motion, the culture that is built around the family and friends, that you’re never expected to do it alone, the  generosity of spirit,  the sounds and smells, the warm welcomes and the optimism.”

Acutely aware of “an inherent imbalance of power” and the concept of White Saviorism, Gold uses the Swahili term Tuko sawa, which means “We are all the same”, as the foundation of her work.

We all want healthy children and families and a future with opportunities to provide long, healthy, prosperous lives, she expounds.

Beyond this core belief, Gold says that she always develops relationships with the people she works with.

“I educate myself on the origins and current status of their culture. I don’t tell people what to do, I share my experiences and expertise. I always learn from them.”

 

Doing more with less 

Ingenuity is something she’s gathered from working alongside East Africans.

For instance, Gold was struck by the engineering of incubators for very sick babies at  St. Joseph’s Hospital in Moshi, Tanzania.

If there is electricity, she explains, the heat is controlled by the number of light bulbs lit. The wood absorbs the heat, the aluminum components absorb and reflect heat, the mattress absorbs heat but also protects the baby, and the lid retains the heat but allows for monitoring of the baby. Mosquito netting is fashioned around the system.

Gold notes that Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) is practiced for almost all premature babies, but it’s not common among sick babies. [Read about skin-to-skin efforts just north of Tanzania here:  https://www.ourmilkyway.org/skin-skin-gulu-uganda/]

 

Hunger: hidden and stark 

A recent Lancet Global Health Publication, Revealing the prevalence of “hidden hunger”, released estimates of two billion people worldwide with one or more micronutrient deficiencies, noting that this is a gross underestimate. The hunger and deficiencies that Gold and her colleagues witness are rarely hidden and often quite obvious.

A severely malnourished child holds onto one of the toy cars that Gold collects and brings for the children at the clinics.

Breastfeeding is important in the prevention of different forms of childhood malnutrition, including wasting, stunting, over/underweight and micronutrient deficiencies. Tanzania scores quite high in the World Breastfeeding Trends Initiative (WBTi) World Ranking.

Gold observes that all of the women breastfeed in the low-income neighborhoods she visits.

The struggle, she says, is getting enough nutrition for the women to sustain milk production and have energy to feed their babies. During her most recent visit, Gold reports that almost none of the 35 families had food in the home.

Reporters of the new estimates for micronutrient malnutrition point out that processed fortified foods and micronutrient powders can be an easy answer to hunger, but they don’t create sustainability of local and indigenous foods and create conflict of interest issues with industry.

Gold adds that low income community members can’t afford to buy industry developed foods consistently. Lack of access to clean water is also a barrier.

“And you can’t depend on outside groups to sustain you,” she continues.

“We didn’t see any processed food at all because there is no market for it,” Gold says of visiting seven different neighborhoods in the low income region of Dar es Salaam. Instead, small markets with locally-grown fruits and vegetables prevail, but access to protein is a challenge.

As medically indicated, ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) packets of fortified peanut butter issued by UNICEF are given out through health clinics. But Gold notes that sometimes parents sell these packets for money.

 

A challenge but not insurmountable 

North of Dar es Salaam, in Moshi, Gold brings a portable printer that doesn’t require Wifi to the small hospital where she volunteers. She gifts each postpartum mother a printed 4×6 photo of herself and her baby.

“You don’t know how many of these babies are going to survive due to the high infant mortality rate.”

There’s a long moment of silence between us on the video call.

Then Gold expresses her frustration and anger,  “The world can fix this, but chooses not to.”

She urges us to educate ourselves and others. Vote for people who have a vision of the world as one world, she says.

Last month, the President signed into law H.R. 4693, the “Global Malnutrition Prevention and Treatment Act of 2021,” which authorizes the United States Agency for International Development to undertake efforts to prevent and treat malnutrition globally.

For those interested in making financial contributions or donations like baby clothes, children’s  books, or toy cars, email Gold at talkinghealthoutloud@gmail.com.

Follow Gold’s organization Talking Health Out Loud on Facebook here.

For an interesting discussion on Numeracy Bias, check out this episode of Hidden Brain. Numeracy bias is described this way: “…When you see one person suffering, you feel like, ‘Oh, I can do something for that person.’ But when you hear that a whole country has a refugee crisis, you tend not to get involved because you feel like, ‘Well, this is overwhelming. I don’t think I can do anything about this, so I’m not going to engage.’…It turns out that people who have experienced a high level of lifetime adversity are immune to this bias.”

 

Other resources

Micronutrient Deficiencies

UNICEF Child Food Poverty

UNICEF No Time to Waste

UNICEF Fed to Fail

Father holds son born prematurely skin-to-skin, facilitates bonding and steps up for breastfeeding

Eight years ago, Dennis Gaynor Jr.’s son Samuel was born at 28 weeks gestation weighing 1 lb. 6 oz. Mr. Gaynor was encouraged to hold his baby skin-to-skin during their hospital stay to help improve his baby’s blood oxygen levels, sleep, temperature, breastfeeding and weight gain. Kangaroo Care was a new concept for Mr. Gaynor.

Photo courtesy of the Gaynor family

“[I] didn’t realize that this is such a great way to bond with Sam. But I did it with no hesitation and I’m enjoying every minute, second, and hour,” Mr. Gaynor shared. “The thought of my heart beat going into my sons’ ears brings a melody to my heart.”

Samuel’s mother also held him skin-to-skin and provided her milk which helped them endure several surgeries throughout his first few years of life. 

Mr. Gaynor says that he continued to hold Sam skin-to-skin after they were discharged from the hospital. “He was so small, I was scared to hold him, but that was the only other method,” he explains. “To this day, he lays on my chest; everyone else gives me a normal hug, but this is what we’ve always done.”

Photo courtesy of the Gaynor family

Mr. Gaynor and his wife run a 501(C)3 nonprofit organization called Young Men on a Mission: YMOM (pronounced why mom) established in the inner city of Milwaukee, Wis.  Their programming includes mentoring, sports and work training intended to help young men “gain hope in themselves to create goals that extend beyond their daily existence; retain hope when it appears that the odds are stacked against them; and dare to be somebody.” Find out more about YMOM here: https://www.youngmenonamission.org/about-us  

Check out Healthy Children Project’s Kajsa Brimdyr’s The 9 Stages of Premature Infants film which shows the nine stages demonstrated by premature infants. Find more here.

For a collection of research on skin-to-skin contact visit: https://www.unicef.org.uk/babyfriendly/news-and-research/baby-friendly-research/research-supporting-breastfeeding/skin-to-skin-contact/ 

You can read Facilitating the bond between children and fathers or male-identifying partners which covers the positive effects of skin-to skin contact on paternal attachment here.