Brenda Hwang’s, MA, CCC-SLP, CLC, CDP light bulb moment: “My colostrum is in fact enough…”

[Photo by Andrea Piacquadio]
We consider ourselves life-long learners here at Healthy Children Project. Sometimes learning occurs gradually, and sometimes there are the ‘light bulb’ moments.

We put a call out to our followers to share “Aha!” moments with us. Maybe it was a myth busted during the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC) or maybe it happened during a visit with a dyad.

We also called for stories about your babies’ and children’s ‘light bulb’ moments. When have you seen your little ones’ faces light up in discovery and understanding?

The call for stories is still open! Please send your reflections to info@ourmilkyway.org with “Light Bulb” in the subject line. 

This is Brenda L. Hwang’s, MA, CCC-SLP, CLC, CDP illuminating moment. 

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Myth – You have to feed formula in the beginning until your milk “comes in.”

FACT – You do not have to feed formula if you do not want to and your colostrum IS ENOUGH. 

I had an incredible breastfeeding journey with my first born that lasted a little over two years. It was difficult for me to think about other moms not having a positive breastfeeding experience. 

That is when I decided to become a lactation counselor. During my training, I remember learning about helping mothers feel confident about their milk supply (when there are no medical reasons to be concerned about). I remember being fascinated with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and researching if there were any near me for when I deliver again or to recommend my patients to go to for the most pro-breastfeeding support. Unfortunately, there wasn’t one. 

When I gave birth to my second born, I remember feeling overwhelmed by so many emotions following childbirth. I remember trying to remind myself that this was typical as our hormones are off the charts after experiencing what the amazing body just went through to bring new life into the world. I felt like there were so many things that I had little or no control over, but what I did have control over was advocating for immediate skin-to-skin and the opportunity to breastfeed my daughter. That made me feel grounded and confident. 

However, that night came and my daughter wouldn’t stop crying. The nurse would come in and out of our room always looking angry, telling me that my supply was not enough, and that I needed to give my daughter formula for her to stop crying. I kept advocating for myself and reminded my husband that –

  1. Formula was not what we planned for or want, 
  2. I have colostrum and,
  3. My colostrum is in fact enough and the best thing that we can give to our daughter right now. 

Although I knew this was true, the sad little cries broke my heart and the nurse’s comments and facial expressions made me feel uneasy. 

Even with the breastfeeding education that I had, she eventually made me believe that perhaps I was wrong and what I had was not enough for my daughter. I dozed off crying quietly to myself, feeling like a failure as a mom. This was my Ah-Ha moment. I thought, “Wow, that was terrible and unfortunately too common of an event that mothers often experience in the hospital.” I would never wish for any mom to feel that way – to feel like she is not enough, or a failure as a mom.

I am now dedicated to providing breastfeeding education during pregnancy… to help moms feel prepared for the first few moments after baby is born. I strive to find a role in the hospital in order to advocate for parents who wish to breastfeed and to provide timely interventions so that they too can have a positive breastfeeding experience. 

Thank you for reading my story.



Full spectrum doula facilitates multilateral programming to support BIPOC breastfeeding

When Meah El, SFW, TCP, CBE, a Full-Spectrum Doula, Education Specialist, Doula Team Leader and Cribs for Kids Coordinator at The Foundation for Delaware County, was just eight years old, she landed her first job. On summer trips to New England, El would help her aunt in her in-home daycare.  When her aunt gave birth to a premature baby in her late forties, El was the only one her aunt trusted in helping out with the baby.

“I always say that my career found me,” El reflects.

She stayed on this early education career path, later working with Maternity Care Coalition as an Early Head Start advocate. Through this work, she became trained as the first doula at their site.

“I loved it ever since,” she says. “Birth work is the crème de la crème.”

El remembers one of her first clients, a 15-year-old mother, and struggles to put into words just how amazing it felt to help a birthing mother.

To enhance her ability to support lactating and breastfeeding clients, El took a breastfeeding course with Nikki Lee  and now, she is one of the latest recipients to earn the Accessing the Milky Way scholarship which covers the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC). A colleague of hers is also working through the LCTC, so they have scheduled a weekly meet up to review the course material together.

El is dedicated to helping BIPOC families reach their breastfeeding goals and dedicated to improving overall health within BIPOC communities through healthy infant feeding.

While Chester and Delaware counties have relatively high breastfeeding initiation rates, the overall infant feeding culture “hushes” breastfeeding, and BIPOC families are up against barriers to breastfeeding like lack of education, familial support, and skilled lactation care, as El explains.

During Black Breastfeeding Week (BBW) 2023, El facilitated a celebration complete with henna artists, reiki sessions, infant foot massage, aromatouch hand massages for parents, brunch and a breastfeeding photo shoot. El will curate the images from the photo shoot into an art installation during next year’s BBW celebration.

Moreover, El is working to establish a lactation cafe, a peer breastfeeding support group run by breastfeeding champions in the community, and mini trainings for staff at The Foundation.

Logo by Meah El

In order to combat breastfeeding misinformation on social media, El will create social media “shorts” with practical breastfeeding information that will be disseminated through the organizations channels. El is also in the process of working with the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) to recognize breastfeeding-friendly businesses.

All of these efforts are part of El’s goal to create a supportive environment around breastfeeding.

“If there’s no community support and no support at home, [the system] is built to fail,” El begins. “I want everyone to win.”

El encourages Our Milky Way readers to share their breastfeeding photos on social media and tag #delcobreastfeeds in order to normalize breastfeeding. She also reminds readers to explore the multitude of programs available at The Foundation for Delaware County. You can contact El directly for direction.