Trauma-informed care

More awesome graphics at: https://stores.praeclaruspress.com/free-posters-and-graphics/

Johanna Sargeant’s BA, BEd, IBCLC Mastering Lactation Conversations: Creating Successful and Achievable Care Plans is an excellent reminder of compassionate and effective counseling. Early in her presentation, Sargeant unpacks the perception that lactation care providers (LCP) can sometimes desire breastfeeding “success” more than the clients themselves.

As LCPs, it can be easy to get wrapped up in checklists and targets and “perfect” latches, forgetting about the complexity of the human experience and how infant feeding is inextricably influenced by parents’ lived experiences. Parents must be allowed to define their own terms of success, and as LCPs, we must honor the complexity of their lives. 

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month which is as good a time as any to focus on trauma-informed care, which should be the standard of care for all perinatal services.  

Sexual trauma is common and affects approximately 20 to 25 percent of women, according to  Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Ph.D., IBCLC. 

Image by Nadezhda Moryak

“Abuse survivors can experience a full range of responses to breastfeeding: from really disliking it to finding it tremendously healing, “ she writes in an Uppity Science Chick publication.

All of those many years ago that I completed the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC), one of the most striking bits I took away was learning about the “hands off” approach. I was perplexed that this even needed to be emphasized( though I had experienced a “handsy” LCP after the birth of my first daughter and have so many friends who share similar experiences.)

These cloth breasts are a solution to demonstration without touching people’s bodies. (It is advised to exercise care when dealing with breast models in childbirth and breastfeeding education as the symbolic dismembering of the female body can carry powerful negative messages.)

Jennie Toland’s BSN, RN, CLC article on trauma-informed care reminds us that acknowledging the existence of trauma and its effects is the first step LCPs can take to providing proper care.

“Recognizing signs such as anxiety or emotional numbing can prompt further discussion that builds trust and fosters collaboration and engagement,” Toland writes. “…It can be as simple as asking if someone would prefer the door shut for privacy, positioning ourselves so we are not standing over another person when performing assessments, or verbalizing next steps and asking for consent to move forward…. It can happen within just a few seconds as we ask, ‘What is your preference?’ to provide someone with control over their care.”

[Here’s an older piece that explains how the simple prompt “May I?…” changed the way I view healthcare.]  

Toland writes that trauma-informed care does not need to be complicated, and the approaches she suggests aren’t specific to any one kind of trauma. 

While birth and breastfeeding can be remedial and healing for trauma survivors, these experiences can also be the source of abuse and trauma. 

Dr. Gill Thomson’s work describes this phenomenon. 

Dr. Karen Scott’s work through Birthing Cultural Rigor challenges the reality of maternity care for Black Indigenous People of Color (BIPOC). Indeed,  “We cannot fix the maternal mortality problem without fixing the human rights problem at its core.

There are so many others acknowledging trauma and incorporating compassionate care. In Milwaukee, BOMB Doulas are providing wrap-around care services, thorough screenings like the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) and sensitive, respectful care.

Photo by Mateusz Dach: https://www.pexels.com/photo/photo-of-baby-on-mother-s-arm-4504005/

The White Ribbon Alliance UK offers programming like Safer Beginnings which includes Free From Harm for maternity workers which works to address obstetric violence.  

There are those like Audrey Gentry-Brown, Full Spectrum Birth Sista, Certified Blactation Educator (CBE), Student Midwife, and Medicine Woman in Loudoun County, Va. working to  rewrite cultural norms within her community, introducing “Afrofuturist healing modalities” that reconnect to “ancestral magic.” 

Xavier Dagba’s words embody her work well: “As you focus on clearing your generational trauma, do not forget to claim your generational strengths. Your ancestors gave you more than just wounds.” 

Photo by Serdi Nam: https://www.pexels.com/photo/close-up-of-mother-breastfeeding-baby-19178588/

Shawn Ginwright, a Black clinician, shares a similar ethos in a piece that challenges traditional approaches to trauma-informed care by exploring the distinction between simple ‘treatment’ and true healing.

“A healing centered approach to addressing trauma requires a different question that moves beyond ‘what happened to you’ to ‘what’s right with you’ and views those exposed to trauma as agents in the creation of their own well-being rather than victims of traumatic events,” Ginwright writes. “Healing centered engagement is akin to the South African term ‘Ubuntu’ meaning that humanness is found through our interdependence, collective engagement and service to others. Additionally, healing centered engagement offers an asset driven approach aimed at the holistic restoration of young peoples’ well-being. The healing centered approach comes from the idea that people are not harmed in a vacuum, and well-being comes from participating in transforming the root causes of the harm within institutions.” Essential reading! 

Other relevant resources and articles 

Full spectrum doula facilitates multilateral programming to support BIPOC breastfeeding

When Meah El, SFW, TCP, CBE, a Full-Spectrum Doula, Education Specialist, Doula Team Leader and Cribs for Kids Coordinator at The Foundation for Delaware County, was just eight years old, she landed her first job. On summer trips to New England, El would help her aunt in her in-home daycare.  When her aunt gave birth to a premature baby in her late forties, El was the only one her aunt trusted in helping out with the baby.

“I always say that my career found me,” El reflects.

She stayed on this early education career path, later working with Maternity Care Coalition as an Early Head Start advocate. Through this work, she became trained as the first doula at their site.

“I loved it ever since,” she says. “Birth work is the crème de la crème.”

El remembers one of her first clients, a 15-year-old mother, and struggles to put into words just how amazing it felt to help a birthing mother.

To enhance her ability to support lactating and breastfeeding clients, El took a breastfeeding course with Nikki Lee  and now, she is one of the latest recipients to earn the Accessing the Milky Way scholarship which covers the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC). A colleague of hers is also working through the LCTC, so they have scheduled a weekly meet up to review the course material together.

El is dedicated to helping BIPOC families reach their breastfeeding goals and dedicated to improving overall health within BIPOC communities through healthy infant feeding.

While Chester and Delaware counties have relatively high breastfeeding initiation rates, the overall infant feeding culture “hushes” breastfeeding, and BIPOC families are up against barriers to breastfeeding like lack of education, familial support, and skilled lactation care, as El explains.

During Black Breastfeeding Week (BBW) 2023, El facilitated a celebration complete with henna artists, reiki sessions, infant foot massage, aromatouch hand massages for parents, brunch and a breastfeeding photo shoot. El will curate the images from the photo shoot into an art installation during next year’s BBW celebration.

Moreover, El is working to establish a lactation cafe, a peer breastfeeding support group run by breastfeeding champions in the community, and mini trainings for staff at The Foundation.

Logo by Meah El

In order to combat breastfeeding misinformation on social media, El will create social media “shorts” with practical breastfeeding information that will be disseminated through the organizations channels. El is also in the process of working with the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) to recognize breastfeeding-friendly businesses.

All of these efforts are part of El’s goal to create a supportive environment around breastfeeding.

“If there’s no community support and no support at home, [the system] is built to fail,” El begins. “I want everyone to win.”

El encourages Our Milky Way readers to share their breastfeeding photos on social media and tag #delcobreastfeeds in order to normalize breastfeeding. She also reminds readers to explore the multitude of programs available at The Foundation for Delaware County. You can contact El directly for direction.

Creative solutions for facilitating traditional Navajo birth

It was a whopping 102 degrees during the day with plummeting temperatures at night in Shiprock, New Mexico on the sacred land of Navajo Nation. The soon-to-be new parents’ camp was set up completely off grid with no running water or electricity.

Indigenous Doula, student homebirth midwife, and New Mexico Doula Association birth equity co-chair Natasha Bowman and her colleague Indigenous Doula and the Executive Director for The Navajo Breastfeeding Coalition Amanda Singer, CLC got to chatting about how they could best serve their client who desired a traditional Navajo birth under these conditions.

Considering their own well-being and the safety of their clients, Bowman and Singer initially joked about hauling Bowman and her fiancé LaDarrell Skeet’s fifth wheel out onto the land. But Skeet helped make it a reality.

The team was able to set up a mobile birthing suite for the new family and their care team complete with air conditioning, clean water and a bathroom. What’s more, the certified professional midwife attending the birth brought along her small trailer too.

“When we do births on the Navajo reservation, we have to think outside of the box,” Bowman explains.

Bowman, who has always been interested in labor and delivery, realized while working with the University of New Mexico’s Birth Companion Program, the lack of Indigenous birth workers. During one training, in a roomful of 40 participants, three were Indigenous.

“I was shocked,” Bowman says. “There has to be a change. There has to be more Indigenous birth workers.”

Later, Bowman attended another training with the Changing Woman Initiative, where she first met Singer. Since then, they’ve been realizing their vision of more Indigenous doulas and birth workers.

Bowman and her partners are continually learning the traditional Navajo ways of birthing and bringing those rituals to their clients.

“Some [clients] are for it, and some are against it because they have always been told they should be birthing in a hospital,” Bowman begins.

She goes on to explain that some of her clients have been scolded and ridiculed by pediatricians, other health care providers and even family and friends for planning a home birth despite the evidence confirming that among low-risk women, planned home births result in low rates of interventions without an increase in adverse outcomes for mothers and babies.

Bowman describes some of the elements of traditional birth which include integrating song, herbal remedies, teas and tinctures, and traditional dress in sash belts and moccasins.

“We believe in the exchange of energy and thoughts,” Bowman continues. “Good intentions, pure thoughts, and lots of prayers.”

It is customary for birth workers to tie a bandana over their heads as well as a Sani scarf, sash belt, or rebozo with an arrowhead tucked inside around the waist to protect the reproductive system.

“It is to protect us from the powerful energy the laboring parent is releasing,” Bowman explains. “It is like armor for us.”

Bowman and Singer and their partners are confronting the health realities in their community through other collaborations too. Their funding partners are The Kellogg Foundation, The Brindle Foundation and United HealthCare. Partnering organizations include Indigenous Women Rising, New Mexico Doula Association, Bidii Baby Foods and Saad K’idilyé, a grassroots organization dedicated to providing traditional teachings to the urban Diné communities around Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Last summer, the Saad K’idilyé Diné Language Nest (SKDLN) opened as a  central urban hub where Saad K’idilyé meets with families, babies, caretakers, and its community.

“A language nest is a community site-based language program for children from birth to three years old where they are immersed in their Native (heritage) language,” as described on their website. “SKDLN is a safe, home-like environment for young children to interact with Diné Bizaad speakers, often elders, through meaningful activities.”

Bowman was able to witness the interactions.
“It was amazing!” she exclaims.

Eventually, Bowman says that she and her colleagues would like to create their own Indigenous Doula training with teachings specific to Navajo birth culture.
In the meantime, they’re celebrating National Breastfeeding Month with Indigenous Milk Medicine Week: From the Stars to a Sustainable Future during the week of August 8 to 14. The breastfeeding coalition will reveal a Navajo translation breastfeeding art piece during this celebration.

And while the fifth wheel doula mobile has stirred up great interest within the community on social media, for the time being, there won’t be an expansion of this service. Bowman and Skeet’s fifth wheel remains on the move though, helping keep the birth team comfortable. Follow its tracks by following the Navajo Breastfeeding Coalition on Facebook.