Nurturing care is critical to improving health outcomes

Photo by Greta Hoffman

A friend recently told me, “I vowed to never use the word ‘diet’ in front of my daughter.” She explained how as she was growing up, her mother was fixated on dieting, and how that affected her relationship with food and her body image. I sympathized. My grandmother was a model, and I grew up in a ballet school, so body image was always at the forefront of my existence. My friend and I discussed the challenge of modeling healthy eating for our kids when we ourselves have been inflicted with such detrimental habits; things like eating in secrecy and restricting calories. 

Our conversation segued, soon chatting about convenience and ultra processed foods, what exactly are healthy choices?, and this incessant feeling of being rushed. We lamented about the after-school pace: hurry-up homework, hurry-up mealtime, hurry-up extra-curriculars, hurry-up bedtime.

Photo by August de Richelieu

The time to model healthy eating and the ability to engage socially over a meal is so condensed, families often forgo the art of dining and sharing meals entirely. Many of us have fallen to “the packet apocalypse”, propped bottles, hurled yogurt tubes to the back of the van, and scarfed- down burgers from the drive-thru.

Checking my email later this day, I was pleased to find Global Health Media’s recent announcement of their Nurturing Care Series.  While the 10-video collection is intended for health workers and not necessarily for direct family use, the resource felt like the perfect reminder of the importance of prioritizing responsive, nurturing and reciprocal interactions in all of our behavior, including meal time. 

Photo by Keira Burton

Global Health Media’s series is in partnership with USAID’s Responsive Care and Early Learning (RCEL) project which focuses on “good health, adequate nutrition, safety and security, responsive caregiving, and opportunities for early learning” as critical components to improving early childhood development (ECD) outcomes. 

“Integrating responsive care and early learning messages into existing nutrition counseling has significant potential to improve both nutrition and ECD outcomes,” the organization’s Advancing Nutrition page states. 

Over the years, Our Milky Way has produced quite a collection highlighting responsive feeding and interactive relationships. Stewed in a bit of irony, as I write to you from the glow of my computer, I’d like to spend this week resurfacing these pieces. 

 

 

 

  • Photo by Luiza Braun

    Mother and bab(ies) attend and respond to one another facilitating nourishment, the flow of hormones, immunity, learning and bonding, comfort, fun, an all-encompassing sensory experience that has generational impacts on social, emotional and physical health. Breastfeeding is collaborative covers the intimacy of the breastfeeding dyad up to breastfeeding as a collaborative global food security system. 

 

 

  • Cindy Turner-Maffei’s coverage of the “Nutrition and Nurture in Infancy and Childhood: Bio-Cultural Perspectives” conference… well, it’s really all in the title. 

 

  • Humans are carry mammals, not nest or cache animals. Baby-wearing facilities things like  the development of healthy physiological functions to providing a interactive social interactions for infants and young children, where they are included in the “action” rather than strapped into devices with little stimulation. Babywearing as a public health initiative  highlights Rebecca Morse’s work and further explores the importance of baby wearing.

 

 

  • Finally, we couldn’t close out without noting skin-to-skin, where connections are first fused outside of the womb. Find Our Milky Way’s collection on skin-to-skin and kangaroo mother care here and here

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.