Lindsey Brown McCormick’s, PhD, LPCC-S, PMH-C, CLC light bulb moment

[Photo by Andrea Piacquadio]
We consider ourselves life-long learners here at Healthy Children Project. Sometimes learning occurs gradually, and sometimes there are the ‘light bulb’ moments.

We put a call out to our followers to share “Aha!” moments with us. Maybe it was a myth busted during the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC) or maybe it happened during a visit with a dyad.

We also called for stories about your babies’ and children’s ‘light bulb’ moments. When have you seen your little ones’ faces light up in discovery and understanding?

The call for stories is still open! Please send your reflections to info@ourmilkyway.org with “Light Bulb” in the subject line.

Lindsey Brown McCormick, PhD, LPCC-S, PMH-C, CLC is the owner of Women Thrive Counseling & Consulting LLC. This is her light bulb moment. 

——

Dr. McCormick
Used with permission

I did not go into the field of mental health counseling with the goal or intention of working with mothers/birthing people and babies. It was never on my radar as something that clinicians even specialized in. The birth of my daughter changed everything for me. 

I’ve been working in the field of trauma and traumatic stress since 2010. My spouse and I welcomed our daughter, currently our only child, into the world November 2021. I was induced and labored for 22 hours before I was whisked away into the operating room for an emergency cesarean. Though everything was seemingly normal on the surface, between the complications faced in labor and the OR, internally I was far from okay. The spiral of postpartum anxiety had entered the chat. 

It was after we came home, in the stillness of the village that lived so far away, crying on my couch with a cluster feeding newborn, I realized two things: 1) I didn’t know anything about perinatal mental health, and 2) I didn’t know where I could even go to learn. 

In the following weeks, my spouse would arrive home from work and I would dump everything that I had discovered that day onto him. I was so energized, so eager to learn, and I was jumping into the deep end of this new clinical niche. I enrolled in a perinatal mental health training program. Upon completing that, I enrolled in the Certified Lactation Counselor training course. Bridging these disciplines, as a practitioner, just made sense to me. There can be a significant amount of mental health problems that arise from attempting to body feed: anxiety, trauma, and grief, to name a few. And, as an attachment theory and parenting nerd, I absorbed research on skin-to-skin care like a sponge. 

As I’ve continued to specialize in this field, I greatly appreciate the value of blending perinatal mental healthcare and lactation care, the healing benefits of skin-to-skin care after a traumatic birthing experience, and the neuroscience of matrescence and infant (0-3) development. It’s provided me opportunities to learn more about the relationship between my daughter and me. It’s positively influenced my parenting style. It’s positively influenced my approach as a counselor and an educator. There are FEW psychotherapists who have lactation credentials out there, and I feel honored to be one of them. 

 

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.