Jess Fedenia’s, CLC light bulb moment: “Life is full of ands instead of either ors.”

[Photo by Andrea Piacquadio]
We consider ourselves life-long learners here at Healthy Children Project. Sometimes learning occurs gradually, and sometimes there are the ‘light bulb’ moments.

We put a call out to our followers to share “Aha!” moments with us. Maybe it was a myth busted during the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC) or maybe it happened during a visit with a dyad.

We also called for stories about your babies’ and children’s ‘light bulb’ moments. When have you seen your little ones’ faces light up in discovery and understanding?

The call for stories is still open! Please send your reflections to info@ourmilkyway.org with “Light Bulb” in the subject line.


This is my light bulb moment.


That funny little mind blown emoji has peppered many of my interactions. I find it perfectly depicts my reactions to and revelations from the massive matrix of varying perceptions of reality that the internet has offered us. Before emojis were a staple in my vernacular though, I remember a light bulb moment that illuminated something in and around me and helped shape my perception of reality and identity.  

In Chantal Molnar’s 2013 piece Breastfeeding and Feminism she writes:

“Breastfeeding refutes the cultural bent that breast’s primary function is as sex objects. America has an uneasy relationship with breastfeeding and has a hard time facing the duality inherent in breast’s function. Sex versus nurture, or sex and nurture? We don’t seem to have any problem with the duality of our mouths, which can be for sex and for eating. We do not make people cover their heads with a blanket when they are eating in public simply because the mouth is frequently used sexually.”

When I first read this, my daughter was two and breastfeeding, and I was pregnant with my second daughter. Though I wanted to embrace an attitude that I had no qualms about breastfeeding in public, I was always truly a bit uneasy about the threat of being harrassed for doing so. But Molnar’s piece gave me the brilliant analogy I needed to defend myself in the case that I was approached by some dismayed onlooker (which never actually happened in all the years I breastfed three children.) 

That handful of sentences also ignited a recognition of the multi-dimension within me. Interestingly, while Molnar pinpoints American culture’s fixation on the sexual breast, I had a self-perception confined to “Milk Maker”. Though I felt the power of this identity and an appreciation of the magic of its intricate, complex and beautiful function, I failed to see myself as sexy after becoming a mother. Molnar’s words invited me to reconsider how I viewed myself. 

Maybe most importantly, I like to think that this recognition of the multiplicity within myself  has helped me to be more aware and accepting of the diversity and complexities outside of myself. Molnar’s piece revealed to me that life is full of ands instead of either ors.   



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