Progress through podcast: Care provider supports families through relevant lactation education

When Tangela L. Boyd, MA, IBCLC, CLC, CLE, CCCE, CPD, a Union Institute & University affiliated faculty member and owner of Mommy Milk  & Me, Inc., had her twin boys 14 years ago becoming a mother of four, she simultaneously entered a space of advocacy.

“I had a very adventurous time with those guys in the NICU,” Boyd remembers. “It changed the way I thought about breastfeeding.” 

As a young Black mother, Boyd says she feels fortunate to have had support from hospital staff to feed her twins (which she went on to do for three years), acknowledging that this is not often the case for BIPOC families

“That support in turn gave me the desire to help other mommies,” she says.

Boyd’s passion lies in uplifting underserved communities, particularly families living in the rural regions of the Southeast U.S. where she lived for nearly 20 years. 

Now located in Florida, Boyd’s newly released podcast, The Early Postpartum Period, offers a way to stay connected and reach underserved mothers with basic, relevant breastfeeding information. 

Boyd admits that the technology was something new to her and it required much patience to bring the project to fruition. Still, she says, it’s something that she wants to commit to for a long time to come, connecting with families especially in the time after they’ve left the hospital. Boyd hopes to soon host focus groups to get a better understanding of what kind of information families would like her to cover in the episodes. 

In the meantime, she plans to release more episodes over the summer. Her practice emphasizes the importance of organization, so she’s planning a podcast featuring organizational skills and time management tips. 

“There is a lot of lactation education out there and I don’t want to be repetitive,” Boyd begins. “I want to hit areas that will really be relevant and give [parents] something they can use, not just something they can listen to.”  

Boyd explains that learning organizational skills can bring a sense of calmness which allows parents the energy to move forward with daily tasks, rather than getting engulfed by an often chaotic world. She suggests things like preparation, avoiding procrastination and working up endurance through taking a breath and stepping away when necessary. 

Especially as our country examines our foundations and current events have brought race to the forefront, Boyd emphasizes the urgency to address high Black maternal mortality rates.

The pandemic has illuminated ways in which to address these rates, Boyd explains, like out of hospital birth and doula support. 

“We have to move forward,” Boyd encourages. 

You can connect with Boyd on Twitter here and find her website here

Boyd has been featured on Ifeyinwa Asiodu’s PhD, RN, IBCLC Blacktation Diaires for her work on increasing breastfeeding and perinatal education rates among BIPOC. She has also written for Kimberly Seals Aller’s Mocha Manual.

Accessing the Milky Way scholarship opportunity

Recently, Healthy Children Project put out a statement about our stance on the current events. “These are incredibly trying and painful times. As we negotiate the very current multiple impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, recent events remind us that systemic racism and social injustice are longstanding national plagues…For too long families of Black and Brown babies have lived in fear for their children, themselves and their loved ones. The Healthy Children Project and the Center for Breastfeeding will not tolerate injustice, hate, bigotry and racism in any form.”

We expressed our solidarity with birthing families, our staff, our participants, our families, our communities, and our friends and hold Black, Indigenous , Mothers of Color in our hearts, our mission and our vision and reiterated that we will not tolerate injustice, hate, bigotry and racism in any form. We especially remember the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.”

Our mission and focus is all about supporting mothers and their breastfeeding journeys. We know that Black women experience maternal mortality and morbidity at three to four times the rates of white women and infant mortality is twice as high for babies born to Black mothers when compared to babies born to white mothers. We also know that breastfeeding can help mitigate both of these unacceptable disparities. 

We are taking steps to help Black mothers and Black communities while staying focused on what we do best; train people to assist with breastfeeding. 

Healthy Children Project and the Center for Breastfeeding has always been committed to making lactation care community diverse and equitable. We have worked to make the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC) accessible by giving scholarships each year to organizations such as ROSE and HealthConnect One.

But we realized that we could do even more. Towards that end, we announce that we have started an initiative called Accessing the Milky Way. This initiative will send Black, Indigenous , People of Color to the online LCTC by offering scholarships that range from partial to full. 

The first phase of this initiative will provide full tuition for the online LCTC on full scholarship for 25 BIPOC. This Accessing the Milky Way scholarship will pay the entire tuition for the course. 

In addition, we have started a fund to pay for the required text book and the testing fee for each of the 25 recipients to further eliminate barriers to becoming a Certified Lactation Counselor. 

We invite you to nominate a person that you know who wants and deserves the opportunity to take the LCTC in order to better serve and support the mothers in their community. We will be accepting nominations now through July 10, 2020. If you would like to nominate an individual, please send an email to info@centerforbreastfeeding.org and include the nominee’s name, phone number, email address, city and state, and a short description of the work they are doing and the benefit to their community by them becoming a Certified Lactation Counselor. Self-nominations are welcome. 

There are two fixed costs that cannot be covered by the scholarship. The cost of the text book is $75.75 and the fee to take the exam after the class (administered by the Academy of Lactation Policy and Practice) is $120.  This additional $195.95 is another barrier to BIPOC getting training that will support the families in their communities. Healthy Children Project faculty is working to raise a total of $4900 which would cover these fixed costs for all 25 recipients of the scholarship. Those interested in growing this fund may visit the GoFundMe page here.

A call to reinvigorate the International Code Of Marketing Of Breastmilk Substitutes

Last month marked the 39th anniversary of the World Health Organization (WHO) International Code Of Marketing Of Breastmilk Substitutes. As the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) reminds us,  “Following the adoption of the Code in 1981, governments have been called upon by the World Health Assembly to give effect to the provisions in the Code through national legislation. So far, UNICEF/ World Health Organization (WHO)/ #IBFAN have identified 136 countries as having Code regulations in place.”

Photo by Andre Adjahoe on Unsplash

You might know that the U.S. is not one of these nations. 

In a timely offering– when formula companies use the crises of the pandemic to prey on mothers and babies– The Network for Global Monitoring and Support for Implementation of the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes and subsequent relevant World Health Assembly Resolutions (#NetCode) has developed a toolkit to reinvigorate and reinforce ongoing monitoring and periodic assessment of the Code and national laws. The toolkit offers health advocates an opportunity to connect with governments to establish a sustainable system that will monitor, detect and report violations of national laws. Find it here: https://waba.org.my/netcode-toolkit-for-ongoing-monitoring-and-periodic-assessment-of-the-code/?fbclid=IwAR2PzeROMctrsCJ3ZiG8gah07IXQMhI-3eSn6EqLDhV3-TdGhhmk-IxDzt4

“Formula manufacturers are exploiting the panic and fears of contagion to intensify their aggressive marketing practices,” Patti Rundall writes in the Baby Milk Action policy blog. “In this context, government action to regulate the marketing of breast-milk substitutes has never been greater.”

On May 28, the World Health Organization (WHO), UNICEF, and the International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN) launched the virtual 2020 Status Report which highlights which countries have implemented measures required by the Code. [The official launch event can be viewed here.]

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

“Given the important role of health workers in protecting pregnant women, mothers and their infants from inappropriate promotion of breast-milk substitutes, the 2020 report provides an extensive analysis of legal measures taken to prohibit promotion to health workers and in health facilities,” Thahira Shireen Mustafa, Department of Nutrition and Food Safety, writes. 

In the U.S. in late March, Baby-Friendly USA released a statement detailing access to adequate nutrition for babies born during the Covid-19 crisis with an announcement explaining that BFUSA  would relax one standard regarding the provision of small quantities of formula upon discharge to formula feeding families in communities experiencing shortages in retail outlets. 

“We did so to ensure that formula feeding families receive essential support during this global emergency,” BFUSA CEO Trish MacEnroe writes. “We did NOT loosen restrictions on interactions with formula companies.”

MacEnroe goes on to write, “Regrettably, some formula companies have interpreted our statement as a window of opportunity to reengage their aggressive marketing tactics with Baby-Friendly designated hospitals… 

“We at BFUSA are appalled that these companies would use the pandemic as an ‘opportunity’ to advance their business interests under the guise of an intent to support facilities during this difficult time.

So, please let us be perfectly clear: Our standards are still our standards. We have not ‘loosened’ our guidelines and we still expect Baby-Friendly designated facilities to shield health care workers, mothers and families from commercial influence, as outlined in the International Code of Marketing Breast-Milk Substitutes.”

Photo by Luiza Braun on Unsplash

In other parts of the world too, companies exploit the Covid-19 crisis. Baby Milk Action documents how one company violates Indian Law with their YouTube channel. Keep scrolling and scrolling and scrolling on Baby Milk Action’s page and you’ll find offense after offense after offense documented in multiple countries. 

In response, there are several documents cited offering guidance on how to navigate avoiding partnerships with these corporations.  Find them here

On an individual level, this is a great time to remind Certified Lactation Counselors (CLCs) of our Code of Ethics which states we must “Abide by the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes and subsequent resolutions which pertain to health workers.”

Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC) offered completely online for first time ever

In this uncertain time, it can be helpful to remember that we have control over the way we respond to the things we don’t have control over. Healthy Children Project joins individuals, businesses and organizations that have had to adapt to this strange, challenging Covid-19 situation. 

“When you face challenges, we have two choices: Let it stop you or find a way to grow and make a difference, even during challenging times. Now, more than ever, lactation counselors are needed to promote, protect and support breastfeeding families, even though we temporarily find ourselves in a place where face-to-face courses can’t happen,” says Karin Cadwell, Healthy Children Project’s executive director. 

Since social distancing and safer-at-home policies have been implemented, Healthy Children Project (HCP) was propelled to use this as an opportunity to offer the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC) completely online for the first time ever. 

“While we still strongly believe that the experience of being together for the LCTC course has provided wonderful opportunities for meeting new friends and colleagues and networking, the changing times have propelled us to revisit the course delivery options,” Cadwell says. 

ALPP will offer an online, remotely-proctored CLC exam starting this week

The LCTC course combines up-to-date high level evidence, counseling training, policy and practice.

“I have learned so much already that medical school, 20 years of practicing and nursing four babies never taught me. (I am only in the second section!)” one participant shares. 

Another participant shares: “I was extremely happy with this course, as it was taught in a way that was inclusive, free of bias, and with much knowledge. In addition, the evidence that was provided was exceptional. Though I was not able to do this course in person, the instructors created a course that was not only highly educational, but also enjoyable. Thank you again to all that made this course happen.”

Photo by Charles Deluvio on Unsplash

The online LCTC is a self-paced online course presented in an engaging and energetic format through videos, self-check questions and competency verification and twice-weekly office hours with faculty to answer additional questions for online participants. 

“I am truly enjoying the format of this course and it definitely helps that you are all so entertaining and fun! I feel like I am sitting in your living room and you are telling me everything you know and it is quite lovely!” on participant exclaims.

The course should take 52 hours to complete (just like the in-person version).

“I’m so impressed with our participants. They are working on the course when they get back from a long day working in the hospital or in between their kids online school zoom meetings. They are finding ways to grow and learn, even with this new ‘normal’ we are all experiencing,” according to Healthy Children Project faculty Kajsa Brimdyr.

Offering the LCTC online has produced some unexpected benefits like accessibility. 

“I love that we are able to offer this to those who need the flexibility of online learning, those who may not be able to get five days off in a row can take this course on their own time, in a way that works for busy lives and schedules,” says Brimdyr.

“I enjoyed the teaching methods utilized and enjoyed the ability to work on training while having the ability to pause and do other duties for my employment as well,” another participant attests.

What’s more, faculty has gotten creative about how to best replicate the face-to-face experience. 

“The office hours are a popular aspect of the new online class,” says Healthy Children Project’s Anna Blair. “Karin and I have had a great time getting to know the participants and help them think about how to integrate the new information into their practice. It’s really fun. My dog, Sandy, occasionally joins us and I love seeing all the faces (and participants’ babies and dogs) on the screen during the office hours.” 

Blair continues, “It is so nice to connect with the participants who are going through this journey.” 

Participants have also shared that one of their favorite parts of the course is  the virtual office hours with faculty. 

“It is really helpful hearing some of the questions and answers people are asking/getting,” one explains. 

Participants can email questions in advance or ask questions during the office hours in the chat feature of the program. In the absence of in-person learning, this feature replicates the value of hearing others’ questions. Each office hour section is logged and labeled by topic so that students can revisit and review the questions at their convenience. 

Photo by Richard Jaimes on Unsplash

“We kept thinking about the phrase ‘Laurus crescit in arduis’ –Laurel grows in steep and difficult places,” Cadwell begins. “Not only have we seen amazing stories of resilience in the news and with our friends, our team at Healthy Children has been focused on making a difference in the world. We all have, and need, the opportunity to bloom. Learning together, we can share our experiences and knowledge. We have loved hearing from our participants during the course – their ideas, experiences and future plans. We all can work together to make a difference for breastfeeding families.”


To register for the Online Lactation Counselor Training, please click here.

Guiding informed decision making about tongue-tie revision

In the service industry, the customer is always right. In lactation, ‘Mother knows best’. 

Lauren Zemaitis MA, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech pathologist who specializes in infant, toddler and school-aged children with feeding disorders. Her son– now three years old– was diagnosed with tongue-tie by a hospital-based IBCLC when he was about one day old. 

“It is still such a vivid interaction in my mind,” Zemaitis begins. 

“We had some difficulty latching within the first 24 hours. I had some [birth] complications so I was a little groggy and the two of us were just trying to figure [breastfeeding] out,” she remembers. 

“The nurses were having trouble helping me, so an IBCLC came in and was very aggressive talking at me through the latching process. She shoved her finger into my son’s mouth while he was crying and told me he had ties and said, ‘You won’t have a good breastfeeding journey. These have to get revised before you leave the hospital,’” Zemaitis continues.

“I was just like, What?” she remembers, still affected by lingering medication. 

Throughout the rest of the day she and her son laid skin-to-skin, and he latched. 

The following morning, the lactation consultant returned. She inquired about Zemaitis’s conversation with their pediatrician the night before. 

Zemaitis explains: 

“She was very aggressive again and said, ‘I know the ped came in last night. Did you talk to him about what I said? I said we did talk with the ped and right now we don’t want to pursue a revision, he’s not even 72 hours old. She said, ‘Well I just still don’t think this going to work for you.’ I explained what I do [for a profession] and she said, ‘Oh, so you know this is going to affect his feeding skills and speech development.’ I finally said that no we’re not going to do this, that I want to see where this breastfeeding journey is going to go. She said, “Fine” and left the room.” 

From that point on, Zemaitis often doubted her ability to breastfeed her baby. 

“The specialist set me up to think I wasn’t going to be successful,” she says. 

Even so, Zemaitis and her baby went on to breastfeed for over a year. 

Their story is a great reminder that we look to lactation care providers (or any health care provider) for guidance, not dictation. Professionals are positioned to help us make informed decisions. Ultimately, parents are their children’s health authorities, and in this case and in many others, Mother knows best. 

Their story is also a powerful anecdote about hotly debated tongue-tie diagnoses and treatments. 

Zemaitis considers tongue-tie a “buzz word” among some professionals meaning it’s an overused term, and it’s being over-diagnosed. 

She points out a few concerns she has. 

“Between professionals, there’s a lot of gray area; one person might say it’s a true, very taught tongue tie that needs immediate revision and someone else may say we just need to do something else like working through the re-latching process or sucking skills,” she explains. 

She also worries that pointing out tongue ties (especially if done in the manner she’d experienced personally) might plot doubt in moms. 

“The doubt continues to get bigger and bigger in terms of their emotions around it and then when something goes wrong, or different than they thought it would, they immediately doubt themselves and their decision around tongue revisions,” she goes on.

What’s more, Zemaitis notices that many revisions are being performed around three to four months of age, at which point babies have established motor patterns. Sometimes, a revision can disrupt those patterns and has to relearn them. 

Tongue-tie revisions, which sometimes sound as benign as clipping one’s fingernails, can be simple, but they can also require a more involved surgery, cutting into muscle and requiring extensive pre and post exercise and follow up care.  Zemaitis points out that parents can be apprehensive to touch the revision site to perform this care.  

When tongue tie is suspected, she and her colleagues look for a functional deficit like limited tongue mobility and/or strength and the impact on feeding development and skills, not solely the structure of the mouth. 

They’ve found that things like suck training, repositioning at the breast, and counseling mothers to allow the baby to latch rather than trying to “control” the nipple and baby’s movement can be effective tools before referral for revision is suggested. 

Through personal experience and after completing the Lactation Counselor Training Course (LCTC), Zemaitis centers her work in good counseling. 

“I think the counseling piece is something that we all really strive to continue to do better,” she says. “The counseling piece in the training was really valuable. I learned a lot by doing the small group projects and working with other professionals from other settings; how can we all do better with the active listening piece?” 

Zemaitis has the opportunity to uplift and celebrate her clients in their natural environment when she’s doing home visits. She particularly loves working with families with premature and medically complex babies. 

She explains that one of these families biggest challenges is transitioning from hospital to home and feeling like they have to start back at square one with their infant’s care. 

Zemaitis considers some of her biggest successes when she sees babies go from being completely reliant on tube feeding to becoming oral eaters. She and her colleagues are inspired by the work the children and their parents go through to ultimately “trust food”. 

“[Parents] thank us,” she begins. “We say, it’s because of you. We are guiding you. You are making the choices for your children.”